May 10, 2018

Georgina Chapman gives first interview on ex-husband Harvey Weinstein

Harvey Weinstein and Georgina Chapman at the 2017 Vanity Fair Oscar Party. Photo: David Livingston/Getty Images

Fashion designer Georgina Chapman has broken her silence about the scandal involving her disgraced ex-husband Harvey Weinstein, telling Vogue's Jonathan van Meter that she was “humiliated and so broken” to learn about the allegations of sexual assault, claiming that she "never" knew of Weinstein's alleged behavior.

“That’s what makes this so incredibly painful: I had what I thought was a very happy marriage. I loved my life.”
— Chapman in profile for Vogue‘s June issue.

Reporter’s note: At one point during the interview, Meter said Chapman cried “so hard she has to take a moment.” Meter added: “It is almost unbearable to witness this broken person in front of me."

The backdrop: Chapman announced last October she’s leaving Weinstein after 11 years of marriage in the wake of the sexual misconduct allegations. She shares two children with Weinstein — ages 7 and 5.

What they're saying: Vogue's Anna Wintour defended Chapman in her June editor’s letter:

“I am firmly convinced that Georgina had no idea about her husband’s behavior; blaming her for any of it, as too many have in our gladiatorial digital age, is wrong. I believe that one should not hold a person responsible for the actions of his or her partner. What Georgina should be receiving is our compassion and understanding.”

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California's "woman quota" law seems to be working

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

When California passed its boardroom law requiring public companies based there to have at least one female director, there were concerns it would spark a gold rush for the same handful of well-known women — but that hasn’t happened.

Why it matters: Of the 138 women who joined all-male California boards last year, 62% are serving on their first company board, per a study by accounting firm KPMG. That means a majority of companies aren't contributing to so-called overboarding in corporate America.

House warned of Russian effort to re-elect Trump

Russian President Vladimir Putin and President Trump meet at the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, last June. Photo: Susan Walsh/AP

The nation's top election-security official warned the House Intelligence Committee last week that Russia is interfering in the 2020 election to help President Trump get re-elected, continuing to attempt to sow discord among the American electorate, the AP reports.

Why it matters: The warning raises questions about the integrity of the presidential campaign and whether Trump's administration is taking the proper steps to combat the kind of interference that the U.S. saw in 2016.

U.S. and Taliban announce first step in Afghanistan peace process

Photo: Karim Jaafar/AFP/Getty Images

The State Department confirmed Friday morning the U.S. and Taliban have "reached an understanding" that starts a 7-day "reduction of violence" to be followed by a signed U.S.-Taliban agreement.

Why it matters: The Afghanistan war is the longest war in U.S. history. President Trump has previously pulled out of talks at the last minute, only to restart them.

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