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George Soros, Founder and Chairman of the Open Society Foundation, waits for the start of a meeting at EU headquarters. Photo: Olivier Hoslet, Pool Photo via AP

George Soros has invested $18 billion in Open Society Foundations, according to foundation officials, the Wall Street Journal reports. And Soros, who is one of the world's most successful investors, has done it again.

Why it matters: "Now holding the bulk of Mr. Soros's fortune, Open Society has vaulted to the top ranks of philanthropic organizations, appearing to become the second largest in the U.S. by assets after the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, based on 2014 figures from the National Philanthropic Trust."

  • About: "Having lived under both communism and a Nazi occupation in Hungary ... Soros hoped to foster 'open societies' in places where authoritarian governments held power."
  • Abroad: "Open Society ... operates through a network of more than 40 foundations and offices in countries from Afghanistan to South Africa. It has funded refugee relief, public-health efforts ... Open Society's activism has sometimes angered nationalist governments."
  • At home: "In the U.S., where Mr. Soros is a major contributor to liberal and Democratic causes, he is a lightning rod for conservatives. Open Society has supported efforts to overhaul immigration policies and the criminal-justice system ... It has supported activists working on issues raised by ... Black Lives Matter."

Go deeper with the Journal.

Go deeper

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
7 mins ago - Economy & Business

Scoop: Red Sox strike out on deal to go public

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The parent company of the Boston Red Sox and Liverpool F.C. has ended talks to sell a minority ownership stake to RedBall Acquisition, a SPAC formed by longtime baseball executive Billy Beane and investor Gerry Cardinale, Axios has learned from multiple sources. An alternative investment, structured more like private equity, remains possible.

Why it matters: Red Sox fans won't be able to buy stock in the team any time soon.

Trump political team disavows "Patriot Party" groups

Marine One carries President Trump away from the White House on Inauguration Day. Photo: Patrick Smith/Getty Images

Donald Trump's still-active presidential campaign committee officially disavowed political groups affiliated with the nascent "Patriot Party" on Monday.

Why it matters: Trump briefly floated the possibility of creating a new political party to compete with the GOP — with him at the helm. But others have formed their own "Patriot Party" entities during the past week, and Trump's team wants to make clear it has nothing to do with them.