Carol Elliott waits in line to vote on June 2 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Photo: Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images

Voters lined up for hours to cast ballots in presidential primaries across the U.S. on Tuesday, even amid curfews imposed for protests over George Floyd's killing.

Zoom in: D.C. and Philadelphia's mayors exempted voters from curfews as long as they got into line to vote by 8 p.m. In D.C., some waited in line for four hours near McKinley Technology High School and were still out well past the city's 7 p.m. curfew. Others outside Washington's Hardy Middle School were still in line after 9 p.m.

  • Voters were lined up outside the Ida B. Wells Middle School in D.C. near midnight.
Voters take a knee at 7 p.m. to honor black lives near the Murch Elementary School in NW Washington, D.C. on June 2. Photo: Sara Goo/Axios
Voters wait in a line during early voting in Monroe County, Bloomington, Indiana on June 1. Photo: Jeremy Hogan/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images
A voter receives hand sanitizer from a poll worker in Northwest Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on June 2. Photo: Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images
An election official waits to check in voters at McKinley Technology High School on June 2 in Washington, D.C. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Voters stand in line on June 2 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Photo: Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images
Voters wait in a line during early voting in Monroe County, Bloomington, Indiana on June 2. Photo: Jeremy Hogan/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images
Voters cast ballots on June 2 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Photo: Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images
A sign outside the Murch Elementary School in NW Washington, D.C. on June 2. Photo: Sara Goo/Axios
A woman votes at McKinley Technology High School on June 2 in Washington, D.C. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Go deeper: American carnage in the wake of George Floyd's death

Go deeper

Sep 10, 2020 - World

Huge fire erupts in Beirut port month after deadly explosion

Photo: Sam Tarling/Getty Images

A large fire erupted in Beirut's port Thursday, according to the Lebanese Army, as the city continues to recover from a deadly blast last month that killed at least 190 people and injured 6,500.

What's happening: The fire began in a warehouse that had been damaged in the August explosion — one of the few in the port that had not been leveled by that blast, according to the New York Times. The cause of the fire — or the extent of its damage — is not yet clear, but army helicopters are assisting in efforts to extinguish the blaze, per AP.

Amy Harder, author of Generate
2 hours ago - Energy & Environment

Climate change goes mainstream in presidential debate

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty

The most notable part of Thursday’s presidential debate on climate change was the fact it was included as a topic and assumed as a fact.

The big picture: This is the first time in U.S. presidential history that climate change was a featured issue at a debate. It signals how the problem has become part of the fabric of our society. More extreme weather, like the wildfires ravaging Colorado, is pushing the topic to the front-burner.

Finally, a real debate

Photo: Morry Gash/AP

A more disciplined President Trump held back from the rowdy interruptions at tonight's debate in Nashville, while making some assertions so outlandish that Joe Biden chuckled and even closed his eyes. A Trump campaign adviser told Axios: "He finally listened." 

The result: A real debate.

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