Carol Elliott waits in line to vote on June 2 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Photo: Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images

Voters lined up for hours to cast ballots in presidential primaries across the U.S. on Tuesday, even amid curfews imposed for protests over George Floyd's killing.

Zoom in: D.C. and Philadelphia's mayors exempted voters from curfews as long as they got into line to vote by 8 p.m. In D.C., some waited in line for four hours near McKinley Technology High School and were still out well past the city's 7 p.m. curfew. Others outside Washington's Hardy Middle School were still in line after 9 p.m.

  • Voters were lined up outside the Ida B. Wells Middle School in D.C. near midnight.
Voters take a knee at 7 p.m. to honor black lives near the Murch Elementary School in NW Washington, D.C. on June 2. Photo: Sara Goo/Axios
Voters wait in a line during early voting in Monroe County, Bloomington, Indiana on June 1. Photo: Jeremy Hogan/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images
A voter receives hand sanitizer from a poll worker in Northwest Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on June 2. Photo: Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images
An election official waits to check in voters at McKinley Technology High School on June 2 in Washington, D.C. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Voters stand in line on June 2 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Photo: Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images
Voters wait in a line during early voting in Monroe County, Bloomington, Indiana on June 2. Photo: Jeremy Hogan/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images
Voters cast ballots on June 2 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Photo: Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images
A sign outside the Murch Elementary School in NW Washington, D.C. on June 2. Photo: Sara Goo/Axios
A woman votes at McKinley Technology High School on June 2 in Washington, D.C. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Go deeper: American carnage in the wake of George Floyd's death

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In photos: Thousands evacuated as Southern California fire grows

A plane makes a retardant drop on a ridge on Aug. 2 at the Apple Fire north of Banning in Riverside County, which "doubled in size" on Aug. 1, per KTLA. Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

A massive wildfire that prompted mandatory evacuations in Southern California over the weekend burned 26,450 acres and was 5% contained by Monday afternoon, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said.

The big picture: As California remains an epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S., some 15 separate fires are raging across the state. About 7,800 people were under evacuation orders from the Apple Fire, about 75 miles east of Los Angeles, as hundreds of firefighters battled the blaze. CalFire said Monday that a malfunction involving a "diesel-fueled vehicle emitting burning carbon from the exhaust system" started the Apple Fire.

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Beirut explosion: Death toll rises to 135, officials under house arrest

Photo: Anwar Amro/AFP via Getty Images

The death toll from Tuesday's explosion in Beirut, Lebanon has now surpassed 130, including at least one U.S. citizen, amid a search for answers as to why a huge store of ammonium nitrate was left unsecured near the city's port for nearly seven years.

What we know: The government says around 5,000 people are injured. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said current indications are that the massive explosion was accidental, despite President Trump's puzzling claim on Tuesday evening that it appeared to be a bomb attack.

The 2020 voter registration race

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

The Trump campaign and RNC have now registered 100,000 new voters in the 2020 cycle, more than doubling their numbers from 2016, according to new Trump Victory data provided exclusively to Axios.

Yes, but: Democrats are still registering new voters in key battleground states.