Sep 1, 2018

Bush and Obama pay tribute to McCain

Photos: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Former Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush gave remembrances of their late colleague Sen. John McCain on Saturday.

Why it matters: Both of these presidents ran against and ultimately beat McCain in presidential races, in 2000 and 2008, yet were personally asked by the senator to speak at his memorial service.

From President Bush:

  • “He respected the dignity inherent in every life, a dignity that does not stop at borders and cannot be erased by dictators. He was honorable, always recognizing that his opponents were still patriots and human beings.” (NYT)
  • "Perhaps above all, John detested the abuse of power. He could not abide bigots and swaggering despots. To the face of those in authority, John McCain would insist 'we are better than this. America is better than this.'" (CBS)
  • "The world is smaller for his departure." (CBS)

From President Obama:

  • "He made us better presidents, just as he made the Senate better, just as he made the country better." (CBS)
  • "After all, what better way to get a last laugh than to get George and I say nice things about him to a national audience. But for all our differences, for all the time we sparred, I never tried to hide - and I think John came to understand - the longstanding admiration that I had for him." (CBS)
  • "Our disagreements didn't go away during these private conversations. Those were real and they were often deep. But we enjoyed the time we shared away from the bright lights, and we laughed with each other, and we learned from each other." (CBS)
  • "He understood that if we get in the habit of bending the truth to suit political expediency or party orthodoxy, our democracy will not work." (NYT)

Go deeper

Updated 30 mins ago - Health

World coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

The number of deaths from the novel coronavirus surpassed 400,000 worldwide on Sunday morning, per Johns Hopkins.

By the numbers: Almost 6.9 million people have tested positive for COVID-19 globally and more than 3 million have recovered from the virus. The U.S. has reported the most cases in the world with over 1.9 million.

George Floyd updates

Protesters gather north of Lafayette Square near the White House during a demonstration against racism and police brutality, in Washington, D.C. on Saturday evening. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Tens of thousands of demonstrators have been rallying in cities across the U.S. and around the world to protest the killing of George Floyd. Huge crowds assembled in Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and Chicago for full-day events on Saturday.

Why it matters: Twelve days of nationwide protest in the U.S. has built pressure for states to make changes on what kind of force law enforcement can use on civilians and prompted officials to review police conduct. A memorial service was held for Floyd in Raeford, North Carolina, near where he was born. Gov. Roy Cooper ordered all flags to fly at half-staff to honor him until sunset.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 6,898,613 — Total deaths: 399,832 — Total recoveries — 3,087,714Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 1,920,061 — Total deaths: 109,802 — Total recoveries: 500,849 — Total tested: 19,778,873Map.
  3. Public health: Why the pandemic is hitting minorities harder — Coronavirus curve rises in FloridaHow racism threatens the response to the pandemic Some people are drinking and inhaling cleaning products in attempt to fight the virus.
  4. Tech: The pandemic is accelerating next-generation disease diagnostics — Robotics looks to copy software-as-a-service model.
  5. Business: Budgets busted by coronavirus make it harder for cities to address inequality Sports, film production in California to resume June 12 after 3-month hiatus.
  6. Education: Students and teachers flunked remote learning.