DNA sequencing is producing vast amounts of data, but researchers and doctors often don't know what it means or what can be done about the information it reveals, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Why it matters: Providers and scientists are grappling with how much information to give patients who have had their genes scanned.

  • Some argue that it's not providers' place to decide to withhold patient information.
  • On the other hand, such information can cause anxiety when it's not "medically actionable," or it can lead patients to get unnecessary or harmful care.

The big picture: Many clinics and studies give patients only a few dozen results that reveal genetic causes for conditions that are treatable.

  • The Mayo Clinic, for example, will look for gene variants that cause heart disease or breast cancer and give those results to patients. But it won't look at variants for early-onset Alzheimer's or Lou Gehrig's diseases.

What we're watching: More providers and research projects are performing broad genetic scans, often for studies or drug development. The question of what to do with the data is only going to become more prominent.

Go deeper: Genetic testing firms share your DNA data more than you think

Go deeper

Updated 5 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1 p.m. ET: 33,443,701 — Total deaths: 1,003,337 — Total recoveries: 23,200,183Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 1 p.m. ET: 7,159,222 — Total deaths: 205,345 — Total recoveries: 2,794,608 — Total tests: 102,342,416Map.
  3. Health: Americans won't take Trump's word on the vaccine, Axios-Ipsos poll finds.
  4. States: NYC's coronavirus positivity rate spikes to highest since June.
  5. Sports: Tennessee Titans close facility amid NFL's first coronavirus outbreak.
  6. World: U.K. beats previous record for new coronavirus cases.

NYC's coronavirus positivity rate spikes to highest since June

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio. Photo: Noam Galai/Getty Images

New York City's coronavirus positivity rate has ticked up to 3.25%, its highest since June, Mayor Bill de Blasio said at a news conference on Tuesday.

Why it matters: The jump — from 1.93% on Monday — came on the first day that public elementary classrooms reopened in the city after months of closures, but guidelines state that all public schools will have to shut if the citywide seven-day positivity rate stays above 3%.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

AppHarvest is going public

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

AppHarvest, a Morehead, Ky.-based developer of large-scale tomato greenhouses, is going public via a reverse merger with a SPAC called Novus Capital (Nasdaq: NOVSU). The company would have an initial market value of around $1 billion.

Why it's a BFD: This is about to be a "unicorn" based in one of America's poorest congressional districts. AppHarvest CEO Jonathan Webb tells Axios that the company will employ around 350 people in Morehead by year-end, and that its location allows its product to reach 75% of the continental U.S. within a one-day drive.