The World Economic Forum's annual Global Gender Gap Report released on Oct. 25, 2016, found that the global gender pay gap will not be closed for another 170 years if current trends continue. Photo: Jessica Hill / AP

Steve Rattner, in one of his famous charts for "Morning Joe," uses new Census Bureau data to show women closing the pay gap with men last year by the largest amount since 2007.

"The female to male earnings ratio reached 80.5%, the highest ever. However, the gap was closed both by women earning more and men earning less. In dollar terms, the typical man earned $51,640 last year; the average woman received $41,554."

P.S. N.Y. Times Quote of the Day: James Freeman, the founder of Blue Bottle Coffee, about the prospect of going public in a stock offering (instead, the company was acquired by Nestlé): "Everything that I've seen and read, it seems like a way of living in hell without dying."

Go deeper

Miriam Kramer, author of Space
12 mins ago - Science

The next environmental crisis could be in space

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

An unexpected frontier is facing calls for new environmental regulations and cleanup: outer space.

Why it matters: Space junk clutters up orbits and poses an urgent threat to weather, security, communications and other satellites. Long-term, you can’t live or work in space if trash is literally slamming into you.

41 mins ago - Health

Axios-Ipsos poll: Trump's sickness makes him harder to trust

Data: Axios/Ipsos poll; Note: ±3.3% margin of error; Chart: Axios Visuals

Large shares of women, seniors and independents now say they're less likely to trust President Trump for accurate information about COVID-19 since he caught it himself, according to the latest installment of the Axios/Ipsos Coronavirus Index.

The big picture: Week 28 of our national survey has most Americans rejecting ideas that Trump has floated around hydroxychloriquine as a virus treatment, how herd immunity works or any imminent availability of a vaccine.

NY Post story goes massive on social media despite crackdowns

Data: NewsWhip; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

Facebook and Twitter's frantic attempts to stop the spread of the New York Post's Hunter Biden story didn't prevent the article from becoming the top story about the election on those platforms last week, according to data from NewsWhip.

Why it matters: The data shows that even swift, aggressive content suppression may not be swift or aggressive enough to keep down a story with as much White House backing and partisan fuel as this one.