A person displays Netflix on a tablet in North Andover, Mass. Photo: Elise Amendola / AP

Netflix blew past user growth expectations, reporting Monday that it added 5.3 million new subscribers last quarter, upwards of 1 million more than expected.

  • In total, it added 850,000 new U.S. subscribers and 4.45 million new international subscribers.
  • Netflix predicts that it will add 6.3 million new subscribers next quarter, which would bring its total to 111.2 million paid subscribers globally.
  • The company also continued to beat expectations on revenue, although profit came in slightly lower than anticipated.

Investors are thrilled: Netflix stock reached an all-time high in after-hours trading Monday after the network proved it could continue strong user growth internationally. Its U.S. subscription growth has been slowing, but that's because its user base is pretty saturated in North America.

Why it matters: Hitting revenue estimates is a big win for Netflix, given that it poured a ton of money into programming investments (more below), as opposed to focusing on profit. It's also another reminder for Pay-TV providers and TV networks that the traditional cable bundle can't compete with the power of on-demand.

  • "It's increasingly clear that the price/value of the legacy video bundle is unsustainable," says BTIG media analyst Rich Greenfield. "Netflix is growing subscriptions at higher prices, driving more money to spend on content — a virtuous circle."

What's next? Netflix's chief content officer Ted Sarandos on Monday'searnings said the tech giant is inching closer towards producing dailynew, original content and will invest a lot more in original films: "We plan on (releasing) about 80 (original films) coming up next year and they range anywhere from the million-dollar Sundance hit, all the way up to something on a much larger scale."

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