Evangelical leader Franklin Graham, son of the late Billy Graham, tells "Axios on HBO" why he supports President Trump, who has been accused by multiple women of sexual misconduct and has previously bragged about his extramarital affairs:

"Now people say 'Well Frank but how can you defend him, when he's lived such a sordid life?' I never said he was the best example of the Christian faith. He defends the faith. And I appreciate that very much."

More highlights from the interview with "Axios on HBO":

  • Graham weighed in on declining church membership: "In this country, we have seen in the last 70 years, the liberalism in churches. And those churches, those denominations, a lot of that has membership has gone down as people have left. But churches that teach the Bible, believe the Bible, are doing well."
  • More on why he supports Trump, despite his treatment of women: "Trump has admitted his faults and has apologized to his wife and his daughter for things he has done and said. And he has to stand before God for those things."
  • Graham also brushed aside concerns about the church becoming too Republican affiliated: "Well first of all, I'm going to support politicians that are going to support the Christian faith whether they're Democrats, Republicans, Independents. Politicians that are going to guarantee my freedom of worship. And I appreciate the president has appointed now two conservative judges that are going to defend religious freedom, so amen to that."

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Mike Allen, author of AM
Updated 2 mins ago - Politics & Policy

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