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AP Photo/Alan Diaz

Ford is spending $9 billion on profit-sharing checks for its 56,000 hourly workers — an average of about $9,000 each. AP reports Ford's pre-tax profit for the year was $10.4 billion, it's second-best ever.

Trump expense: Ford took a $200 million charge on cancelling a plant in Mexico after Trump criticized the company for moving production out of the U.S. Ford's CFO said the company is watching Trump closely and waiting for for when "specific politics are formulated."

Go deeper

Microwave energy likely behind illnesses of American diplomats in Cuba and China

Personnel at the U.S. Embassy in Cuba in Havana in 2017, after the State Department announced plans to halve the embassy's staff following mysterious health problems affecting over 20 people associated with the U.S. embassy. Photo: Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images

A radiofrequency energy of radiation that includes microwaves likely caused American diplomats in China and Cuba to fall ill with neurological symptoms over the past four years, a report published Saturday finds.

Why it matters: The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine's report doesn't attribute blame for the suspected attacks, but it notes there "was significant research in Russia/USSR into the effects of pulsed, rather than continuous wave [radiofrequency] exposures" and military personnel in "Eurasian communist countries" were exposed to non-thermal radiation.

Georgia governor declines Trump's request to help overturn election result

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp pushed back on Saturday after President Trump pressed him to help overturn the state's election results.

Driving the news: Trump asked the Republican governor over the phone Saturday to call a special legislative session aimed at overturning the presidential election results in Georgia, per the Washington Post. Kemp refused.

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