Feb 8, 2020 - Politics & Policy

WSJ: Millions of Florida voters are unsure if they qualify to cast ballots

A 60-year-old man's voting rights are restored in a Miami-Dade County courtroom in Nov. 2019. Photo: Zak Bennett/AFP via Getty Images

Florida has given little guidance to election officials after the state restored voting rights to an estimated 1.4 million former felons last year, resulting in "widespread confusion," the Wall Street Journal reports.

The big picture: Floridians have until Feb. 18 to register to vote for the presidential primary in the critical swing state. Felons in the state are required to pay outstanding court fees and fines before casting ballots, per a bill that went into effect last year.

What's happening: Florida "has no centralized source that people can consult to determine whether they owe fees, fines or restitution," the WSJ reports, and many Floridians with felony records "fear running afoul of the law by registering to vote."

What they're saying: “It is a confusing, Byzantine morass,” Myrna Pérez, director of the Voting Rights and Elections Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, told WSJ.

  • “We’re going to continue to do everything we can within our purview to get it right,” Rep. James Grant (R-Fla.) told WSJ.

Go deeper: The sticky web of felon voting laws

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California approves new voting system even as concerns remain

California Secretary of State Alex Padilla. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

California Secretary of State Alex Padilla has conditionally approved Los Angeles County's new publicly-owned computerized voting system on Friday.

Why it matters: The Voting System for All People (VSAP) will be the first publicly owned and designed voting system in the U.S. However, many concerns and questions remain about the security of the election machines and other technical problems, AP notes. VSAP still requires some modifications to address these concerns.

Go deeperArrowJan 25, 2020

WSJ: New trade limits on chips for Huawei could hurt U.S. company growth

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Trump administration is weighing new trade restrictions that could force factories across the globe to obtain licenses if they want to use U.S. equipment to make chips for Huawei products, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Why it matters: The restrictions "risk disrupting the global supply chain for semiconductors and dent growth for many U.S. companies," the WSJ reports, citing unnamed U.S. industry participants. One goal of the proposed restrictions is for China to see the action as a threat, per the WSJ.

Go deeperArrowFeb 17, 2020 - World

Sen. Kyrsten Sinema to vote to convict Trump

Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) will vote to convict President Trump on both articles of impeachment, according to the Arizona Republic.

Why it matters: The moderate Sinema was viewed as one of the most likely Senate Democrats to vote to acquit Trump. She joins Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) in voting to remove the president, while the other possible swing vote — Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) — has yet to announce his decision.