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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis speaking in Tallahassee in August. Photo: Don Juan Moore/Getty Images

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said Wednesday he would let the state's moratorium on evictions and foreclosures expire Thursday, according to the Tampa Bay Times.

Why it matters: The governor's office said it is allowing the moratorium to expire because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued an order that temporarily halts some residential evictions through the end of the year to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

What they're saying: DeSantis' spokesperson Fred Piccolo said terminating the state order will "avoid any confusion over whether the CDC’s evictions order should apply in a particular circumstance," according to the Times.

The big picture: To obtain assistance, the CDC's order requires renters to earn less than $99,000 annually and submit a report showing they are unable to pay rent or are likely to become homeless if evicted.

  • Renters must also show that they tried to obtain all government assistance available for rent or housing and they are unable to make payments due to loss of household income, a layoff or extraordinary out-of-pocket medical expenses.
  • The CDC's eviction order is currently being challenged in federal court.

Of note: One estimate from August found that 23 million Americans are at risk of eviction due to the pandemic.

Go deeper: Renters are still in eviction limbo

Go deeper

Congress releases text of $900 billion coronavirus relief bill

Nancy Pelosi and Mitch McConnell. Photo: Brendan Smialowski-Pool/Getty Images

The House on Monday released the text of a $900 billion coronavirus relief package and $1.4 trillion government spending bill that Congress expects to pass before the holidays.

The state of play: The House will move quickly to pass the bill on Monday night, with the Senate likely to stay late to vote in the early hours of Tuesday morning. This gives lawmakers and their staff just hours to review a 5,593-page bill — one of the largest rescue packages in U.S. history.

Kaine, Collins' censure resolution seeks to bar Trump from holding office again

Sen. Tim Kaine (center) and Sen. Susan Collins (right). Photo: Andrew Harnik/Pool via Getty Images

Sens. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) are forging ahead with a draft proposal to censure former President Trump, and are considering introducing the resolution on the Senate floor next week.

Why it matters: Senators are looking for a way to condemn Trump on the record as it becomes increasingly unlikely Democrats will obtain the 17 Republican votes needed to gain a conviction, Axios Alayna Treene writes. "I think it’s important for the Senate's leadership to understand that there are alternatives," Kaine told CNN on Wednesday.

Stark reminder for America's corporate leaders

Rosalind "Roz" Brewer is about to become only the second Black woman to permanently lead a Fortune 500 company. She starts as Walgreens CEO on March 15.

Why it matters: It's a stark reminder of how far corporate America's top decision-makers have to go during an unprecedented push by politicians, employees and even a stock exchange to diversify their top ranks.

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