A U.S. soldier on base in Iraq. Photo: Yasin Akgul / AFP via Getty Images

Strava — a fitness app that links to smartphones and wearable fitness trackers to collect information about exercise habits — released a data visualization map of users' activity, which could reveal the location of secret U.S. military bases, the Guardian reports.

Why it matters: This is a significant security threat because it makes U.S. bases not only identifiable, but mappable to anyone who has access to this fitness app.

The information of military personnel who use Strava was also shared on the heat map, leaving the outposts susceptible to detection.

“In Syria, known coalition (i.e. U.S.) bases light up the night. Some light markers [are] over known Russian positions," writes Middle East institude analyst Tobias Schneider.

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Washington Redskins will change team name

Photo: Patrick McDermott/Getty Images

The Washington Redskins announced Monday that the NFL team plans to change its name.

Why it matters: It brings an end to decades of debate around the name — considered by many to be racist toward Native Americans. The change was jumpstarted by nationwide protests against systemic racism in the U.S. this summer.

Houston public health system CEO says coronavirus situation is "dire"

Houston's coronavirus situation is "dire, and it's getting worse, seems like, every day," Harris Health System CEO and President Dr. Esmail Porsa said Monday on MSNBC's "Morning Joe."

The big picture: Porsa said the region is seeing numbers related to the spread of the virus that are "disproportionately higher than anything we have experienced in the past." He noted that Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital's ICU is at 113% capacity, and 75% of its beds are coronavirus patients.

Fund managers start to board the stock bandwagon

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Asset managers at major U.S. investment firms are starting to get bullish with their clients, encouraging stock buying and trying not to get left behind right as the metrics on tech stocks rise back to highs not seen since the dot-com crash of 2000.

What's happening: Appetite for stocks is starting to return, but slowly as institutional money managers were overwhelmingly sitting on the sidelines in cash during April and May.