Sep 21, 2017

Fewer teens are getting summer jobs

Erica Pandey, author of @Work

Today's teens aren't as likely to get summer jobs as they used to be. But data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that they're four times as likely to take summer classes than in the 1980s, and there are more teens taking unpaid internships. So why don't they want the money?

The bottom line: The steep drop in money earned from jobs and other sources — mainly allowances — for teens occurred in the late 2000s, when the smartphone was born. Why? Because they don't need as much money for socializing if they can do it at home.

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Data: The Decline in Adult Activities Among U.S. Adolescents, 1976–2016, Twenge et al.; Chart: Chris Canipe / Axios

Studies suggest that teens typically spend their money on social activities, such as going out with friends, Laurence Steinberg, a professor of psychology and author of Age of Opportunity, tells Axios. Now, they're able to socialize on their phones, at home. "If they're going out less, then they probably have less of a need for money ... If they don't need the money, then they're not gonna work," Steinberg says.

There are three reasons that could explain why teens don't need the money, Steinberg says.

  1. Social media is free. They can talk to friends without leaving home.
  2. There's a rise in helicopter parenting. Today's parents may be stricter in imposing curfews to keep teens from going out and, consequently, spending money.
  3. Teens are more concerned about their resumes. They're swapping seasonal jobs at frozen yogurt shops and as lifeguards for unpaid internships in career areas of interest to them or summer classes at local universities. The Bureau of Labor Statistics says 10% of teens took summer classes in 1985, compared to 42% in 2016.

Be smart: People are quick to attribute the falling rates of teen employment to laziness. But the truth is, teens are occupying themselves with other productive activities, Steinberg says. "Teenagers can't win. We get mad at them for going out, then we get mad at them for staying home with their parents."

Go deeper: Teens are becoming adults later than they used to.

Go deeper

Updates: George Floyd protests continue for 8th day

Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators outside of the White House on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued Tuesday across the U.S. for the eighth consecutive day, prompting a federal response from the National Guard, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection.

The latest: The National Park Service said in a statement Tuesday that while it "is committed to the peaceful expression of First Amendment rights," it "cannot tolerate violence to citizens or officers or damage to our nation’s resources that we are entrusted to protect."

American carnage

Protesters race up a hill to avoid tear gas in Philadelphia, June 1. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The list of victims has swiftly grown since George Floyd died in police custody just eight days ago.

The big picture: Protests against police brutality have turned into a showcase of police brutality, with tear gas and rubber bullets deployed against crowds. The police have the arsenals at their disposal, but we're also seeing law enforcement officers becoming targets.

McConnell blocks resolution condemning Trump's actions against peaceful protesters

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) blocked a resolution introduced by Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) on Tuesday that would have condemned the use of tear gas and rubber bullets against peaceful protesters outside the White House on Monday in order to allow President Trump to walk to St. John's Church.

What they're saying: "Justice for black Americans in the face of unjust violence, and peace for our country in the face of looting, riots, and domestic terror. Those are the two issues Americans want addressed," McConnell said on the Senate floor.