Aug 7, 2019

FDA receives 92 new reports of seizures after vaping

Juul e-cigarette. Photo: Brianna Soukup/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration is investigating 127 cases of people, particularly children and young adults, who experienced seizures after using e-cigarettes, CNBC reports.

What's happening: The FDA began this investigation in spring, but has recently received about 92 new reports of seizures after vaping. The agency says the evidence has has not established if e-cigarettes directly caused the seizures, and stressed that the 127 cases occurred over 10 years.

“Additional reports or more detailed information about these incidents are vital to help inform our analysis and may help us identify common risk factors and determine whether any specific e-cigarette product attributes, such as nicotine content or formulation, may be more likely to contribute to seizures."
— FDA Commissioner Ned Sharpless in a statement

Go deeper: Doctors, specialists fear "unseen consequences" of teen e-cigarette addiction

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CDC issues e-cigarette warning after respiratory illness reports

Photo: Andrew Burton/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a formal warning on Friday against the use of e-cigarettes, recommending users do not buy bootlegged e-cigarettes or modify vaping products or substances, per a press release.

Why it matters: As of Aug. 27, 215 cases of lung illnesses associated with vaping had been reported, along with 1 death related to e-cigarette use, the New York Times reports.

Go deeperArrowAug 30, 2019

Health officials probe illnesses linked to vaping

Photo: Snap Decision/Getty Images

Almost 100 cases of "mysterious lung illnesses" linked to vaping and e-cigarette use in 14 states have prompted an investigation from state and federal health officials, reports the Washington Post.

Why it matters: "Officials are warning clinicians and the public to be on alert for what they describe as a severe and potentially dangerous lung injury," WaPo reporters Lena Sun and Lindsey Bever write.

Go deeperArrowAug 17, 2019

Juul's growing kids crisis

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Juul's campaign to convince America it does not target kids to vape is getting crushed by lawmakers, attorney generals and the media. The backlash is wicked — and widespread: 

Driving the news: Attorneys general from Illinois and Washington, D.C. are launching new investigations into Juul, and how the company's e-cigarettes became so popular with young people, reports AP. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also issued a formal warning on Friday against the broad use of e-cigarettes and recommended users avoid buying bootlegged vaping products.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Aug 30, 2019