FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn. Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Stephen Hahn said Wednesday that stay at-home coronavirus tests will help states increase their testing capabilities.

Why it matters: Increasing daily tests is a key requirement that states must reach before they can safely relax coronavirus lockdowns.

Driving the news: The Food and Drug Administration announced Tuesday that it granted emergency authorization for LabCorp's first at-home coronavirus test, CBS News reports.

  • The test is a nasal swab kit and will cost $119, though buyers must complete an eligibility survey before receiving one.
  • It will not be available in New York, New Jersey, Maryland and Rhode Island because they have regulations against people initiating their own tests, according to CBS.

What they're saying: Hahn told CBS that health care workers and first responders will have first access to the test when it goes on sale.

  • Hahn added that the test is as effective as those administered in a doctor’s office.
  • "With this action, there is now a convenient and reliable option for patient sample collection from the comfort and safety of their home," he said in a statement.

The big picture: The United States had conducted more than 4 million tests as of Wednesday morning, according to Johns Hopkins University data.

  • The country has tested an average of 146,000 people per day so far in April, according to the COVID Tracking Project.
  • Harvard University researchers suggest that the U.S. cannot reopen its economy unless it triples the number of daily tests, the New York Times reports.

Go deeper: Maryland to receive 500,000 coronavirus tests from South Korea

Go deeper

Updated Jul 31, 2020 - Health

Coronavirus testing still can't keep up with demand

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Testing is once again becoming a critical weakness in the America's response to the coronavirus pandemic, and experts say we may need to revive tighter standards about who can get a test.

Why it matters: Although testing has gotten a lot better over the course of the pandemic, the pandemic has gotten worse, and that means the U.S. needs to prioritize its resources — which might mean that frequent testing solely to help open businesses or schools just isn't feasible.

Updated 57 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 p.m. ET: 18,860,908 — Total deaths: 708,676— Total recoveries — 11,394,821Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 p.m. ET: 4,834,546 — Total deaths: 158,445 — Total recoveries: 1,577,851 — Total tests: 58,920,975Map.
  3. Politics: Pelosi rips GOP: "Perhaps you mistook them for somebody who gives a damn" — Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine tests positive.
  4. Public health: Fauci says task force will examine aerosolized spread.
  5. Business: July's jobs report could be an inflection point for the recovery — Teladoc and Livongo merge into virtual care giant.
  6. Sports: Where college football's biggest conferences stand on playing.

Health care industry tops list of most-favored amid coronavirus

Data: Harris Poll COVID19 Tracker Wave 20; Chart: Axios Visuals

Doctors, nurses and hospitals have experienced a greater increase in consumer trust and confidence than any other industry during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new Axios/Harris poll.