FBI: Scalise shooting had "no nexus to terrorism" - Axios
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FBI: Scalise shooting had "no nexus to terrorism"

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

GOP Congressional baseball shooter James Hodgkinson "acted alone" and "there was no nexus to terrorism," the FBI told reporters Wednesday.

The FBI's definition of terrorism: The "unlawful use of force and violence against persons or property to intimidate or coerce a government, the civilian population, or any segment thereof, to further political or social objectives."

Other details: The FBI is investigating this as an "assault" on a member of Congress and a federal officer. Hodgkinson had a list of six members of Congress in his pocket at the time of the shooting. He was "known to have an anger management problem" and "suffered from taking some prescription medications" but had no history of mental illness.

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EPA loosens radiation safety standards

Photo: Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

The Environmental Protection Agency has labeled levels of radiation 10x greater than those considered acceptable under the Obama administration as not harmful to people's health, according to a Bloomberg report. The EPA sets such regulations in case of nuclear meltdowns or other events that expose the public to radiation.

  • EPA spokesman Michael Abboud said: "EPA has not changed its standards regarding radiation exposure, and no protective guidelines were changed during this administration...The guidance was released on January 11, 2017 -- before the President was inaugurated." Bloomberg said an FAQ on the decision was released last month.
  • Jeff Ruch, executive director of the Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, told Bloomberg: "This appears to be another case of the Pruitt EPA proclaiming conclusions exactly opposite...of scientific research."
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Facebook's head of experimental hardware is leaving

Regina Dugan is leaving Facebook. Photo: Photo by Brad Barket/Getty Images

The head of Facebook's skunkworks division Building 8 will leave the company. Regina Dugan said in a statement given to Recode that there's "is a tidal shift going on in Silicon Valley, and those of us in this industry have greater responsibilities than ever before" and that the "time feels right" to be "thoughtful about new ways to contribute in times of disruption." She said in a different post that she will be in charge of a "new endeavour."

Why it matters: Dugan arrived at Facebook last year to lead a division tasked with projects like building a way to type with your mind. Her departure comes as the company faces enormous pressure over its role in an increasingly unequal and divided society.

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Magic Leap confirms $502 million fundraise

Magic Leap CEO Rony Abovitz
Photo by Brian Ach/Getty Images for Wired

Magic Leap, the secretive "mixed reality" startup, announced on Tuesday that it has raised $502 million in new venture capital funding led by Singapore sovereign wealth fund Temasek. This is the same round that Axios discussed last week, based on a Delaware regulatory filing (which authorized up to $1 billion in new shares at an increased valuation). The post-money valuation appears to be around $5 billion.

Bottom line: Investors clearly keep seeing something they like in Magic Leap, but consumers are still waiting for the Florida-based company's first product to debut.

Cap table: In addition to Temasek, other new Magic Leap investors include EDBI (Singapore), Grupo Globo (Brazil) and Janus Henderson Investors. Return backers include Alibaba Group, Fidelity Management and Research Company, Google, J.P. Morgan Investment Management, and T. Rowe Price.

Related: A pair of former Magic Leap engineers today announced that their new startup, which helps streamline the design process of 3D concepts for VR/AR apps, has raised $3.5 million in seed funding.

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Federal judge blocks Trump's latest travel ban

An Iraqi family landed in the United States as a federal court blocked a travel ban in March. Photo: Felipe Dana / AP

A federal judge in Hawaii has blocked President Trump's third attempt at implementing a travel ban, which was set to go into effect Wednesday.

What's next: The administration is almost certain to appeal, meaning the revised ban could again reach the U.S. Supreme Court. But for now, the block means the administration cannot deny travelers from six of the eight countries officials said were either unable or unwilling to provide the information the U.S. requested for entry.

  • His quote: Judge Derrick K. Watson in Hawaii, who issued a temporary restraining order against the administration, said the latest version of the ban, "suffers from precisely the same maladies as its predecessor."
  • What's in question: As with the previous versions, the underlying decision relies on whether the ban is based on animosity toward Muslims.
  • What makes this ban different from the previous versions: The latest order was only passed after the U.S. underwent extensive negotiations with other countries for more information that would vet their citizens. The list of countries affected by the ban also now includes North Korea and Venezuela, two countries that are not Muslim-majority. The other countries include Syria, Libya, Iran, Yemen, Chad, and Somalia.
  • What critics are saying: Challengers argue the additions are largely "symbolic," per the Washington Post's Matt Zapotosky, who writes that the new order would only impact" certain government officials from Venezuela, and very few people actually travel to the U.S. from North Korea each year."
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Trump's short list for Fed chair

Yellen at a hearing in Washington. Photo: Andrew Harnik / AP

President Trump is expected to name his pick to be chairman of the Federal Reserve before leaving on an Asia trip Nov. 3, Bloomberg reports. Here are the candidates:

  1. Current chair Janet Yellen
  2. Fed board member Jerome Powell
  3. National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn
  4. Former Fed member Kevin Warsh
  5. Stanford University economist John Taylor
Why it matters: "At issue for the next Fed chair, if Yellen isn't renominated, is ensuring the long expansion doesn't give way to a recession," Bloomberg writes.
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Trump calls Alexander-Murray deal a good short-term solution

President Trump said Tuesday he supports the bipartisan health care plan from Sens. Murray and Alexander as a short-term, 1- or 2-year deal, but said the ultimate health care solution is "essentially" the Graham-Cassidy plan.

Trump's quote: "This is a short-term deal because we think that, ultimately, block grants [for the states] are going to be the answer."

Highlights from Trump's press conference with Greece's Prime Minister Tsipras:

  • On Tsipras's comments during Trump's campaign that a Trump presidency would be "evil": The Greek Prime Minister repeated that the two world leaders had a productive meeting. Trump joked, "I wish I'd known that" before my speech ... "A number of countries were nervous" at first.
  • On the markets: "The stock market hit an all-time record high. I hope that Greece is going to be doing the same thing very soon," Trump said.
  • On Greece's defense budget: "I commend Greece for being one of the few NATO countries" spending at least 2% of GDP on defense.
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Alexander, Murray reach bipartisan ACA deal

Sens. Lamar Alexander and Patty Murray want to stabilize the ACA. AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

Sen. Lamar Alexander says he and Sen. Patty Murray have reached a deal to fund the Affordable Care Act's cost-sharing subsidies in exchange for giving states more regulatory flexibility with the law. Shortly after Alexander announced the deal to reporters, President Trump called it a "good short term solution."

What we're watching: Whether this deal can gather enough support to pass — and if so, how quickly.

What's in the deal:

  • Two years of subsidy funding, along with funding for the rest of 2017. There will also likely be additional steps to help enrollees with their premiums in 2018.
  • A "copper plan" for people older than 30, which would be less comprehensive than other ACA plans but would have a lower premium.
  • $106 million in enrollment outreach funding in 2018 and 2019.
  • Shorter review time for states seeking waivers from some of the ACA's coverage requirements. It's unclear what other waiver changes have been agreed to at this time.
  • Authorization for funding to help states launch reinsurance programs, which would defray the costs of covering the sickest consumers.

The reviews: House conservatives offered mixed reactions to the emerging proposal.

  • Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows called it "a good start. Not sure it goes far enough to lower premiums but limited duration plans and HSA expansion might provide better conservative support. I certainly applaud the senators for working hard to address premiums."
  • But here's Republican Study Committee Chairman Mark Walker: "The GOP should focus on repealing & replacing Obamacare, not trying to save it. This bailout is unacceptable."
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Trump loses big in Forbes' richest Americans list

Photo: Alex Brandon / AP

President Trump's net worth has fallen by $600 million over the past year from $3.7 billion to $3.1 billion, according to Forbes' 400 list ranking the richest people in America. Trump, who last year was ranked as the 156th wealthiest person in the country, now falls to No. 248, tied with Snapchat founder Evan Spiegel and others.

"Most notable loser:" Forbes, which has tracked Trump's wealth since the list first debuted in 1982, called Trump this year's "most notable loser," and blamed his losses on "a tough New York real estate market...a costly lawsuit and an expensive presidential campaign."

Key quote: "Trump did not campaign with the magazine in an effort to boost his ranking as he's done in years past" Luisa Kroll, Forbes magazine senior wealth editor, told CNBC. "We'll see if he tweets today. I know he cares a lot."

The top 10 members of America's most exclusive club:

1. Microsoft's Bill Gates is ranked at the top for the 24th-consecutive year, with a net worth of $89 billion in 2017.
2. Amazon's Jeff Bezos is second for the second-consecutive year, with a net worth of $81.5 billion in 2017.
3. Berkshire Hathaway's Warren Buffett is third for the second year in a row, after dropping in 2016 from his 15-year hold on the second spot. His net worth is currently $78 billion.
4. Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg was Forbes' "biggest gainer," with his net worth jumping $15.5 billion to $78 billion.
5. Oracle's Larry Ellison has a net worth of $59 billion.
6 & 7. Koch Industries' Charles Koch and David Koch tied. The brothers have a net worth of $48.5 billion each.
8. Bloomberg's Michael Bloomberg has a net worth of $46.8 billion.
9. Google's Larry Page shows a net worth of $44.6 billion.
10. Google's Sergey Brin has a net worth: $43.4 billion.

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GM will test self-driving cars in New York City

A Cruise Chevy Bolt car. Photo: Cruise

Cruise, General Motors' self-driving car unit, says it plans to test a fleet of autonomous Bolt vehicles in a section of Manhattan in early 2018. The company will be the first to test fully autonomous cars in the state. Cruise has already been testing its vehicles in its hometown, San Francisco, as well as in Arizona and Michigan.

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FCC chairman pushes back on Trump's NBC tweets

Pai at an open meeting earlier this year. Photo: Robin Groulx / Axios

FCC chairman Ajit Pai offered a measured response Tuesday to President Trump's tweets last week arguing for a challenge to broadcast licenses for NBC stations. Pai, speaking at an event hosted by the right-leaning Mercatus Center, said the Federal Communications Commission would not revoke a license based on content.

"I believe in the First Amendment, the FCC under my leadership will stand for the First Amendment, and under the law the FCC does not have the authority to revoke the license of a broadcast station based on the content of a particular newscast."

The bigger picture: Pai's been under pressure to respond as the nation's top media regulator, appointed by a president who regularly attacks the media.

Go deeper: Why Trump can't revoke the licenses. One reason: NBC the network doesn't have a license from the government.