Jun 20, 2017

FBI director nominee deleted Russia case from his law bio

Lawrence Jackson / AP

Christopher Wray, President Trump's nominee to replace former FBI Director James Comey, deleted a line from his law firm bio referencing a 2006 case in which Wray represented an American energy executive who was being investigated by the Russian government, per CNN's KFILE.

What we know: Micheline Tang, a spokeswoman for the law firm King and Spalding, told CNN that Wray removed the detail in January 2017, before he was even considered for taking on the role of FBI Director, in an attempt to make the material on his page "more current." Tang also emphasized that the executive Wray was representing is an American citizen who lives in the U.S., and at the time the law firm, Wray, and the client were "adverse to the Russian Government" as Moscow was looking to exert leverage over the client by launching a criminal investigation.

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CDC issues travel warning as South Korea coronavirus cases near 1,000

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

The CDC warned travelers in an alert to avoid all nonessential travel to South Korea, as the number of confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus in the country rose to 977 on Tuesday morning.

The big picture: WHO has expressed concern about infections with no clear link to China. COVID-19 has killed at least 2,703 people and infected more than 80,000 others, with all but 27 deaths occurring in mainland China.

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Trump says RBG and Sotomayor should recuse themselves from his cases

President Trump at Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel International Airport in Ahmedabad, India, on Monday. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted during his India visit late Monday that Supreme Court justices Sonia Sotomayor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg should "recuse themselves" from cases involving him or his administration.

Why it matters: The president's criticism of the liberal justices comes after he attacked the judge overseeing the case of his longtime advisor Roger Stone, who was sentenced last Thursday to 4o months in prison for crimes including lying to Congress and witness tampering.

Deadly clashes erupt in Delhi as Trump visits India

Rival protesters over the Citizenship Amendment Act in Delhi, India, on Monday. Photo: Yawar Nazir/ Getty Images

Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal called for calm Tuesday as deadly clashes erupted in the city's northeast between supporters and opponents of India's controversial new citizenship law.

Why it matters: Per the BBC, a police officer and six civilians "died in the capital's deadliest day" since last year's passing of the Citizenship Amendment Act — which allows religious minorities but excludes Muslims from nearby countries to become citizens if they can show they were persecuted for their religion — as President Trump and members of the U.S. first family are in Delhi as part of a two-day visit to India, though it's away from the violence.

Go deeper: India's citizenship bill continues Modi's Hindu nationalist offensive