Nov 26, 2017

FBI didn't alert U.S. officials they were targeted by Russian hackers

Traffic along Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington streaks past the FBI headquarters. Photo: J. David Ake / AP

The FBI didn't alert dozens of American officials that a Kremlin-linked hacking group was trying to access their personal Gmail accounts, the AP reports.

The AP interviewed 80 of the current and former officials, many of whom worked in defense or intelligence, and only two had been notified. An anonymous FBI official said there were so many hacking attempts that the bureau couldn't keep up: "It's a matter of triaging to the best of our ability the volume of the targets who are out there," he said.

The same Russian hacking group, Fancy Bear, stole emails from the DNC during the election.

One worrying line: "An AP analysis of the data suggests that out of 312 U.S. military and government figures targeted by Fancy Bear, 131 clicked the links sent to them. That could mean that as many as 2 in 5 came perilously close to handing over their passwords."

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CDC issues travel warning as South Korea coronavirus cases near 1,000

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

The CDC warned travelers in an alert to avoid all nonessential travel to South Korea, as the number of confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus in the country rose to 977 on Tuesday morning.

The big picture: WHO has expressed concern about infections with no clear link to China. COVID-19 has killed at least 2,703 people and infected more than 80,000 others, with all but 27 deaths occurring in mainland China.

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Trump says RBG and Sotomayor should recuse themselves from his cases

President Trump at Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel International Airport in Ahmedabad, India, on Monday. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted during his India visit late Monday that Supreme Court justices Sonia Sotomayor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg should "recuse themselves" from cases involving him or his administration.

Why it matters: The president's criticism of the liberal justices comes after he attacked the judge overseeing the case of his longtime advisor Roger Stone, who was sentenced last Thursday to 4o months in prison for crimes including lying to Congress and witness tampering.

Deadly clashes erupt in Delhi as Trump visits India

Rival protesters over the Citizenship Amendment Act in Delhi, India, on Monday. Photo: Yawar Nazir/ Getty Images

Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal called for calm Tuesday as deadly clashes erupted in the city's northeast between supporters and opponents of India's controversial new citizenship law.

Why it matters: Per the BBC, a police officer and six civilians "died in the capital's deadliest day" since last year's passing of the Citizenship Amendment Act — which allows religious minorities but excludes Muslims from nearby countries to become citizens if they can show they were persecuted for their religion — as President Trump and members of the U.S. first family are in Delhi as part of a two-day visit to India, though it's away from the violence.

Go deeper: India's citizenship bill continues Modi's Hindu nationalist offensive