Joe Uchill Feb 20
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Fancy Bear now fancying Middle East and Asia

Man in bear suit
A fancy (enough) bear. Dan Kitwood / Getty

The believed Russian cyber-espionage group Fancy Bear, best known for hacking a variety of political targets during the 2016 election, turned its focus to Middle Eastern and Asian targets in the second quarter of 2017, according to a new report from Kaspersky Lab.

The intrigue: Fancy Bear is primarily known for attacks against NATO and former Soviet states, with a smattering of attacks against Russian antagonists mixed in. The shift to Middle Eastern and Asian targets would signify a change in priority for the Russian government.

Targets: The new campaign attempted to spear phish China, India, Mongolia Israel, Jordan. the U.A.E. and South Korea, and included government, industrial, non-governmental organizations and translation service targets.

Considering the source: Kaspersky is currently feuding with the U.S. government over innuendoes about the firm's complicity in Russian espionage operations. The company adamantly denies any role to the extent it is currently in two separate D.C. lawsuits to overturn federal bans on its wares.

Haley Britzky 14 hours ago
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Zuckerberg happy to testify if it is "the right thing to do”

A portrait of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg
A portrait of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: Jaap Arriens / NurPhoto via Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said he would be "happy" to testify before Congress if it was "the right thing to do," in an interview with CNN's Laurie Segall.

Why it matters: Facebook has been under the microscope lately for what Zuckerberg called earlier today the "Cambridge Analytica situation." Zuckerberg said if he was the "person...who will have the most knowledge," then he'd be the one to testify in the face of Facebook's data-collection situation.

Bob Herman 12 hours ago
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Jamie Dimon's $141 million payday

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon speaks at an event.
JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon speaks at an event in 2016. Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon took home more than $141 million in 2017 after calculating the actual realized value of his stock, according to a preliminary draft of the banking giant's annual proxy document. Dimon's compensation is calculated as $28.3 million when using the estimated fair value of his stock. But that compensation figure doesn't matter as much because it doesn't reflect what executives report in their personal income tax filings.

Why it matters: It's the highest pay package of any active corporate CEO from 2017, based on Securities and Exchange Commission documents that have been filed thus far. Dimon's compensation is also 1,818 times higher than what the average JPMorgan employee makes.