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Photo: Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Your face is increasingly serving as your password, whether for boarding on some international flights, clearing a security line for an entertainment event or opening your iPhone X.

Why it matters: The privacy tradeoffs for this added convenience and security will be a major issue for companies and governments.

The latest:

  • Tokyo's 2020 Olympic Games will use facial recognition for all accredited individuals, the AP's Mari Yamaguchi reports, in an effort to reduce crowding and make logistics easier. Long lines for athletes are a routine hassle at the games.
  • Mineta San Jose International Airport is the first U.S. airport on the West Coast to embrace biometric security systems from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
  • China's e-commerce giant JD.com is going global with its unmanned store technology, which uses facial recognition to charge customers. The concept is already popular in China, and JD has just opened its first humanless store in Indonesia.

What they're saying:

  • “I would find it superconvenient if I could use my face at the gate,” AI researcher Jonathan Frankle told the N.Y. Times, on the idea of facial recognition as a boarding pass.
  • "[But] the concern is, what else could that data be used for?”
  • Axios' Kaveh Waddell emails to distinguish between government and commercial uses: "Both have their potential downsides, but they're very different: Taken to their logical ends, one path leads to Minority Report-style advertising and the other leads to Xinjiang-style policing and surveillance. Right now, airports are mixing commercial and government facial recognition."

The big picture: This goose is somewhat cooked. Something like half of Americans adults are in police facial recognition databases, a Georgetown study estimated in 2016.

Go deeper

Updated 6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Large coronavirus outbreaks leading to high death rates — Coronavirus cases are at an all-time high ahead of Election Day — U.S. tops 88,000 COVID-19 cases, setting new single-day record.
  2. Politics: States beg for Warp Speed billions.
  3. World: Taiwan reaches a record 200 days with no local coronavirus cases.
  4. 🎧Podcast: The vaccine race turns toward nationalism.

Technical glitch in Facebook's ad tools creates political firestorm

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: SOPA Images / Contributor

Facebook said late Thursday that a mix of "technical problems" and confusion among advertisers around its new political ad ban rules caused issues affecting ad campaigns of both parties.

Why it matters: A report out Thursday morning suggested the ad tools were causing campaign ads, even those that adhered to Facebook's new rules, to be paused. Very quickly, political campaigners began asserting the tech giant was enforcing policies in a way that was biased against their campaigns.

8 hours ago - Health

States beg for Warp Speed billions

A COVID-19 drive-thru testing center yesterday at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens. Photo: David Santiago/Miami Herald via AP

Operation Warp Speed has an Achilles' heel: States need billions to distribute vaccines — and many say they don't have the cash.

Why it matters: The first emergency use authorization could come as soon as next month, but vaccines require funding for workers, shipping and handling, and for reserving spaces for vaccination sites.

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