Matt Rourke / AP

At its annual meeting on Thursday, Facebook shareholders rejected a proposal that the company prepare a report on employee pay across gender and ethnicity.

Facebook's board, which recommended against the proposal, argued that it already has systems in place to combat pay inequality. Arjuna Capital, which submitted the idea, says that third-party data suggests there are still gaps.

Why it matters: Along with hiring, pay gaps have also become a hot topic in Silicon Valley's conversation about diversity. Google is currently embroiled in a court battle over allegations that it's not paying female employees as much as men. Meanwhile, Salesforce has now audited its employee pay two years in a row, and spent $6 million to fill in the gaps, according to the company.

Other highlights from the shareholder meeting:

  • New capital structure: Facebook's plan to restructure in order for CEO Mark Zuckerberg to retain control is still delayed by a lawsuit, so not expected before 2018 at the earliest, said the company.
  • Fake news: The company plans to approach the issue similarly to spam, and wants to make it easier for users to access a spectrum of viewpoints.
  • Oculus: Facebook doesn't plan on making much profit from its Oculus hardware in the next few years—instead it's focused on building content and software and making virtual reality tech as widely available as possible.
  • China: The company wants to reach people in China, but it's taking its time to figure how to best do this.

Go deeper

Mayors plan multifront attack on census shutdown

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A growing number of mayors are banding together to fight what they consider to be an inaccurate and abruptly curtailed 2020 census, using an arsenal of legal, legislative and congressional efforts.

Why it matters: The outcome may determine whether President Trump or Joe Biden controls the redistricting process, which governs everything from congressional representation and redistricting to funding for schools and Head Start.

Moderator Kristen Welker will not control mics during final presidential debate

President Trump and Joe Biden at the first presidential debate in September. Photo: Scott Olson via Getty Images

A producer from the Commission on Presidential Debates will manage the operation of the candidates' microphones during Thursday's final presidential debate — not the event's moderator, NBC's Kristen Welker — a source with knowledge of the event told Axios.

Our thought bubble, via Axios' Alexi McCammond: Given President Trump's accusations of partisanship against the other debates' moderators, it makes sense that Welker would want to steer clear of any such optics during her stint in the chair.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Chris Christie: Wear a mask "or you may regret it — as I did" — Senate Democrats block vote on McConnell's targeted relief bill.
  2. Business: New state unemployment filings fall.
  3. Economy: Why the stimulus delay isn't a crisis (yet).
  4. Health: Many U.S. deaths were avoidable — The pandemic is getting worse again.
  5. Education: Boston and Chicago send students back home for online learning.
  6. World: Spain and France exceed 1 million cases.