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Photo: Johannes Simon/Getty Images

In an internal meeting with staff on Thursday, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said the company is planning to shift the majority of its workforce to be able to work remotely in the next 5-10 years.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic has forced many companies to quickly adopt remote working strategies. Tech companies, which are well-equipped for remote work, are preparing to make remote work the new normal for most of their employees.

Zuckerberg told Axios: "My prediction is that in 5-10 years we could have ~50% working remote. That's not a target, just a prediction based on the demand we've seen so far."

  • "The first steps will be aggressively opening up remote hiring around the whole US and Canada, especially for experienced engineers, as well as letting some employees request to become permanent remote workers."

Details: In an interview with NBC, Zuckerberg said it "doesn't seem that good to constrain hiring to people who live around offices."

  • Zuckerberg says that the company plans to unlocking remote hiring immediately. In the past, Zuckerberg had implied that working in or near a Facebook office was important towards maintaining a strong workplace culture. Now, that idea seems less feasible and less necessary, given that the company continues to perform well despite more people working remotely.

Be smart: Facebook has already said that people can work remotely through the end of 2020 if they choose. It was one of the first companies to tell employees to start working from home, if possible, in the first place. It's already said that non-essential corporate travel is cancelled until 2021.

The big picture: More remote work will be a major trend coming out of the coronavirus. Big companies like Facebook will pioneer that trend.

  • Twitter and Square, both run by Jack Dorsey, announced last week that people could work from home indefinitely if they wanted to.

Go deeper: Many tech workers won't go back to offices after coronavirus crisis

Go deeper

Aug 26, 2020 - Technology

Facebook warns advertisers on Apple privacy changes

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Facebook is warning advertisers that they can expect weaker ad performance from iPhone users once iOS 14 comes out next month and is telling them to create second advertiser accounts to contain the disruption.

Why it matters: Many of Facebook's advertising partners rely on Apple's "Identifier for Advertisers" (IDFA) user tracking feature to, for instance, target would-be users by interest and see if they actually clicked on a mobile ad directing them to install a particular app. Changes to IDFA coming with iOS 14 will have a big impact on the marketing strategies for many businesses, and on Facebook's bottom line.

"Justice for J6" rally underway with large police presence

Police officers watch as demonstrators gather for the "Justice for J6" rally in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 18, 2021. Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

A few hundred demonstrators were met by a heavy law enforcement presence on Saturday at the "Justice for J6" rally outside the fenced-off U.S. Capitol, AP reports.

The latest: U.S. Capitol Police officers at approximately 12:40 p.m. arrested a man with a knife for a weapons violation, the agency wrote in a tweet.

DHS to increase deportation flights to Haiti from Del Rio

Migrants walk across the Rio Grande River carrying supplies back to a makeshift encampment under the international bridge between Del Rio, Texas, and Acuña, Mexico. Officials are struggling to provide food, water, shelter and sanitation, forcing migrants to cross the Rio Grande several times per day for basic necessities. Photo: Jordan Vonderhaar via Getty Images

The Department of Homeland Security on Saturday announced plans to ramp up deportation flights to Haiti out of the small Texas border town Del Rio, starting as soon as Sunday.

Why it matters: Reports have emerged of more than 10,000 migrants, primarily from Haiti, crowded in a temporary camp under the international bridge in Del Rio. Hoping to find refuge in the United States, they've had to bear with filthy conditions and the scorching sun for days, per an NBC News affiliate.