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Facebook looks to wipe out Snapchat

Facebook announced Tuesday it's adding even more Snapchat-like features, including a camera feature that will let users post photos to Facebook directly through a camera button on its app. Snapchat, which recently rebranded itself as a "camera company," pioneered the direct-to-app photo-taking technique when it launched in 2011.

Facebook says it's also adding more filters and animations, and a "stories" feature that nearly mimics Snapchat's 24-hour disappearing posts feature that it launched in 2014.

Why it matters: Many argue that Facebook's Snapchat-like features are not as good as Snapchat's original ones, but it doesn't matter. As Business Insider points out, they don't have to be perfect. "Zuck only needs half a percent of his users to prefer his copycat tool and he will have deprived Spiegel of 10% of his potential future users. That's a serious dent."

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D.C.'s March for our Lives: "The voters are coming"

Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives.
Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives. Photo: Stef Kight / Axios

D.C.'s March for our Lives event is expected to see more than half a million participants.

Why it matters: While D.C. is the primary march, there are hundreds of others around the world and across the country. Led by students, the march is "to demand that a comprehensive and effective bill be immediately brought before Congress to address" gun issues, per the organization's mission statement.

Haley Britzky 8 hours ago
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DOJ eyeing tool to allow access to encrypted data on smartphones

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

The Justice Department is in "a preliminary stage" of discussions about requiring tech companies building "tools into smartphones and other devices" that would allow law enforcement investigators to access encrypted data, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: This has been on the FBI's mind since 2010, and last month the White House "circulated a memo...outlining ways to think about solving the problem," officials told the NYT. Both FBI Director Christopher Wray, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, support finding ways for law enforcement to access data without compromising devices security.