Updated May 15, 2019

Facebook live-stream overhaul in response to New Zealand attacks

Photo: Monika Skolimowska/Picture Alliance via Getty Image

Facebook said Tuesday it's tightening its live-streaming rules, hours before a world leaders' meeting on tackling online violence in response to the New Zealand mosque attacks, which were broadcast on the social media site.

Details: Guy Rosen, Facebook’s vice president of integrity, said in a statement the social media giant would introduce a "one strike" policy, whereby anyone who breaches its rules would immediately be restricted from using Facebook Live for a set period. It would also invest $7.5 million toward research partnerships to improve image and video analysis technology.

The big picture: New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is co-chairing a meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris on Wednesday that aims for world leaders and tech company chiefs to sign the "Christchurch Call" pledge to eliminate violent extremist content online, per Reuters. Ardern called Facebook's measures a "good first step."

What's next: The issue of making social networks more accountable for actions on their sites is expected to be discussed at the G20 meeting in June. In March, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison wrote to Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, chairman of the G20 summit in Osaka, requesting a social media crackdown in response to the live-streaming of the Christchurch attacks.

Go deeper: Christchurch shooting video puts platforms on the spot

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

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Why it matters: Unless a sufficient level of immunity is achieved in the population, the coronavirus could circulate indefinitely and potentially flare up as future outbreaks.

Judge rules all three defendants in shooting of Ahmaud Arbery will stand trial

Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images

A judge ruled on Thursday that all three men charged in the death of Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old black man who was shot and killed in February Glynn County, Georgia, will stand trial, AP reports.

Why it matters: The video of Arbery's death was among several catalysts in the mass protests against racial injustice that have unfurled across the country and world over the past week and a half.

Remembering George Floyd

Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

With politicians, clergy and law enforcement in attendance on Thursday in Minneapolis, the family of George Floyd demanded recognition for his life well lived.

Why it matters: Floyd has become the latest symbol of police brutality after he was killed last week when a police officer held a knee to his neck.