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Photo: SOPA Images / Getty Images

Facebook and Google are extending their bans on political ads to prevent confusion about the election, the Financial Times reported Wednesday.

Why it matters: While tech companies are trying to limit post-election misinformation, hundreds of millions of dollars are about to pour into Georgia, now that control of the Senate — and the fate of the next president's agenda — hinges on runoffs for now one, but both of the state's seats, set for Jan. 5.

The state of play: The platforms originally said the bans would go a week after Election Day, but may continue thereafter. The bans were instituted to prevent messaging that could be misleading or misinform the public about election outcomes, Axios' Sara Fischer reports.

  • President Trump has taken to social media to amplify baseless claims of voter fraud, and his supporters have followed. Facebook has already shut down a number of fast-growing “Stop the Steal” groups, many of which organized around armed protests of alleged voter fraud.
  • Though the ban is intended to limit misinformation, it will create difficulties for Democrats and Republicans as they gear up for Senate runoffs in early January. Political advertising is one major avenue of outreach.
  • Neither Google nor Facebook commented on how their extended ad bans might affect the Georgia runoff.

Facebook’s ban is expected to continue for another month. It's unclear when Google's ban will lift.

What they’re saying: President-elect Joe Biden has said Facebook is not doing enough to strike down the “Stop the Steal" narrative.

  • Biden aide Bill Russo tweeted on Monday that the company is “shredding the fabric of our democracy.”

Go deeper

Paul Ryan calls on Trump to concede race and end lawsuits

Paul Ryan and Joe Biden after the vice presidential debate in 2012. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Former House Speaker Paul Ryan (R) on Tuesday called on President Trump to concede the election to President-elect Biden and "embrace the transfer of power," in an address at a financial conference first reported by Politico.

Why it matters: Trump has continued to deny that he lost the election, despite his administration granting so-called "ascertainment" on Monday, allowing the transition to formally begin.

Tony Hsieh, longtime Zappos CEO, dies at 46

Tony Hsieh. Photo: FilmMagic/FilmMagic

Tony Hsieh, the longtime ex-chief executive of Zappos, died on Friday after being injured in a house fire, his lawyer told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. He was 46.

The big picture: Hsieh was known for his unique approach to management, and following the 2008 recession his ongoing investment and efforts to revitalize the downtown Las Vegas area.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
6 hours ago - Economy & Business

The unicorn stampede is coming

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Airbnb and DoorDash plan to go public in the next few weeks, capping off a very busy year for IPOs.

What's next: You ain't seen nothing yet.