Mar 17, 2019

Facebook's terrible, horrible, no good, very bad week

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Less than a year ago, Recode's Kurt Wagner could write a story saying that "no one in Facebook’s upper ranks ever seems to leave the company." That's not true anymore.

Driving the news: Facebook's #3 executive, Chris Cox, left this week, along with Chris Daniels, who ran WhatsApp. Daniels himself was running the messaging subsidiary only because both of the app's co-founders had already departed — as have Instagram's co-founders.

Also this week:

  • Facebook suffered a six-hour-long outage on Wednesday, which is a very bad look for an institution that aspires to be "the critical infrastructure for modern-day democracy."
  • Facebook is also facing new criminal charges over whether other companies, including Apple, Amazon and Microsoft, were given access to users' confidential social graphs.
  • The white supremacist Australian terrorist who killed 50 people in New Zealand livestreamed his massacre on Facebook.

Why it matters: Mark Zuckerberg has total control of Facebook and its board, and he isn't afraid to wield that control at will. Billions of users can do little more than wait to see what Zuck decides he wants to do to them next.

Go deeper: Facebook, at crossroads, loses veteran execs

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Your best defense against coronavirus

Photo: Adrian Greeman/Construction Photography/Avalon/Getty Images

Washing your hands is the best way to protect against the novel coronavirus, according to doctors and health officials, as the virus continues to spread around the globe.

Why it matters: Clean hands can stop germs from spreading in a community, a known characteristic in COVID-19 and influenza.

Go deeperArrow52 mins ago - Health

Major League Soccer embarks on its 25th season

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

As Major League Soccer begins its 25th season, the league is financially stable and surging in popularity, and its 26 teams have gorgeous facilities and rapidly increasing valuations.

  • It also continues to expand, with David Beckham's Inter Miami and Nashville SC set to debut this season as the 25th and 26th teams. Plans are in place to reach 30 franchises by 2022 — triple the number from 2004.
Go deeperArrow2 hours ago - Sports

Wall Street falls 3% as coronavirus correction worsens

raders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Photo: Scott Heins/Getty Images

Stocks fell more than 3% on Friday morning, pushing stocks further into correction territory.

Why it matters: It continues the ugly stretch for Wall Street that began after a spike in coronavirus cases around the world. The S&P is 15% below its recent peak, edging closer to the mark that would technically end the market’s decade-long rally.

Go deeper: The growing coronavirus recession threat