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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Facebook is expediting the launch of its Facebook News tab in countries beyond the U.S., the company will announce Tuesday. Sources tell Axios that Facebook is working out deals to pay publishers in several countries to include their content in the News tab, just as the firm does in the U.S.

Yes, but: One notable absence from the list of countries is Australia. A source confirms that the company likely won't be launching Facebook News there for the foreseeable future, because of a battle Facebook is fighting with Australian regulators who intend to require the platform to pay news companies on the regulators' terms.

  • Facebook is still in discussions with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission about what a payout framework to publishers could look like.
  • Until the new law is officially passed, things could change, but statements from regulators suggest frustration in their negotiations with tech companies so far.

Details: Facebook is looking to accelerate the launch of Facebook News in multiple countries within the next 6-12 months, including the U.K., Germany, France, India and Brazil.

  • The tech giant is working closely with publishers in those regions to discuss the best ways to shape its news offerings based on the traffic and news consumption habits unique to each region.
  • Facebook plans to work with publishers of different sizes and scope. The idea is to help them reach more readers on the platform through the News tab, which could help support their businesses more broadly over the long term.
  • As is true in the U.S., not all participating publishers will necessarily be paid, and publishers that produce more content will likely receive bigger payouts.

Be smart: It's notable that Facebook is in the early stages of launching a News tab in France, given that regulators in that country were the first to ratify a new EU copyright law last year that requires tech firms to negotiate paying publishers for their content or risk being regulated.

  • While Google has been publicly fighting with regulators in France over the provision for the past year, Facebook's discussions with regulators have been less visible.
  • Germany will also be required to ratify the EU's copyright directive in the next year or so.
  • By starting to negotiate payout deals with publishers now, Facebook could avoid having regulators in those countries establish terms that might be less favorable.

The big picture: The News tab expansion is the latest effort by Facebook to pay news organizations for their work. The company has come a long way from its initial stance of refusing to pay publishers or hire human editors just two years ago.

  • But as regulatory scrutiny intensifies, the company has pushed more aggressively to develop stronger relationships with the news industry.

Go deeper

Nov 19, 2020 - Technology

Facebook says very few people actually see hate speech on its platform

Photo: Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Facebook said it took action on 22.1 million pieces of hate speech content to its platform globally last quarter and about 6.5 million pieces of hate speech content on Instagram. On both platforms, it says about 95% of that hate speech was proactively identified and stopped by artificial intelligence.

Details: In total, the company says that there are 10–11 views of hate speech for every 10,000 views of content uploaded to the site globally — or .1%. It calls this metric — how much problematic content it doesn't catch compared to how much is reported and removed — "prevalence."

Court rejects Trump campaign's appeal in Pennsylvania case

Photo: Sarah Silbiger for The Washington Post via Getty Images

A federal appeals court on Friday unanimously rejected the Trump campaign's emergency appeal seeking to file a new lawsuit against Pennsylvania's election results, writing in a blistering ruling that the campaign's "claims have no merit."

Why it matters: It's another devastating blow to President Trump's sinking efforts to overturn the results of the election. Pennsylvania, which President-elect Joe Biden won by more than 80,000 votes, certified its results last week and is expected to award 20 electoral votes to Biden on Dec. 12.

Dave Lawler, author of World
40 mins ago - World

Belarus dictator Lukashenko says he'll leave post after new constitution

Photo: Valery Sharifulin\TASS via Getty

Longtime Belarusian President Aleksandr Lukashenko has said he will step down after a new constitution comes into force, according to Belarusian state media.

Why it matters: Lukashenko has faced three months of protests following a rigged election in August. He has promised to reform the constitution to reduce the near-absolute powers of the president, but has insisted that his strong hand is needed to see that process through.

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