Screenshot of President Trump's tweet.

A narrow majority of Americans believe Twitter was right to flag one of President Trump's tweets as violating its rules on violence, according to a National Research Group survey being released later Monday.

Yes, but: As with nearly everything right now, there's a sharp partisan and ideological divide.

According to the survey:

  • 54% of Americans support Twitter's decision to add fact-checking labels to Trump's tweets.
  • Of the remainder, 26% thought Twitter was wrong, while 20% neither support nor oppose Twitter's move.
  • Self-described liberals were far more likely to support Twitter, with conservatives more likely to oppose the decision.

Among the other findings:

  • More than three in five Americans (including 42% of conservatives) said that potentially false statements by politicians are a bigger threat than potential censorship by social media companies.
  • Nearly three in four Americans (73%) are concerned that inaccurate information spread via social media could impact the 2020 election, though half of Americans are also concerned that actions taken by the social media companies could unfairly impact the election.
  • Only one-third of Americans support President Trump's decision to sign an executive order that aims to limit the power of social media companies to moderate content. Nearly half (48%) opposed it, while 18% said they neither support nor opposed the order.
  • Nearly half of those who took the survey said they think social media companies are not politically biased, while 38% said social media companies are generally biased in favor of liberals and 16% said the companies are biased in favor of conservatives.

Go deeper

Twitter faces FTC fine of up to $250 million over alleged privacy violations

Photo: Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket

The Federal Trade Commission has accused Twitter of using phone numbers and emails from its users to make targeted ads between 2013 and 2019, Twitter said in an SEC filing published Monday.

Why it matters: Twitter estimates that the FTC's draft complaint, which was sent a few days after its Q2 earnings report, could cost the company between $150 million and $250 million. The complaint is unrelated to the recent Twitter hack involving a bitcoin scam.

Poll: 59% of Americans support nationwide 2-week stay-at-home order

People lay out on the grass while maintaining social distancing guidelines in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Photo: Rob Kim/Getty Images

Over half of Americans surveyed in a new NPR/Ipsos poll support a mandatory, nationwide order to shelter at home for two weeks to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Why it matters: COVID-19 deaths and hospitalizations are rising across the U.S., which saw dramatic surges in new infections this summer. More than 155,000 Americans have died, per Johns Hopkins.

2 hours ago - World

Macron visits Beirut promising a "new political pact" for Lebanon

Macron visits the hard-hit Gemmayzeh neighborhood. Photo: AFP via Getty Images

French President Emmanuel Macron walked through the blast-damaged streets of Beirut on Thursday, swarmed by people chanting for the fall of Lebanon's government and pleading for international aid.

Why it matters: Lebanon is at a breaking point. Its economy was collapsing and its government hardly functioning — all before a massive explosion destroyed swathes of the capital city, including its vital port.