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Photo Illustration by Budrul Chukrut/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

All Facebook employees will be able to take extra paid time off to help staff polls on Election Day and participate in any trainings ahead of time, company executives tell Axios.

Why it matters: The effort comes amid poll worker shortages, with many older people who would typically do the job planning to stay home because of COVID-19.

Details: Facebook will also begin sending notifications to users that are 18 or older about how to sign up as poll workers in their states.

  • The alerts will be placed at the top of the Facebook app beginning Saturday and they will direct users to each state’s website for more signup information.

Flashback: The company announced last month that it's offering free ad credits to election authorities in all 50 states and Washington, D.C., so they can run ads to recruit poll workers.

  • The California secretary of state’s office began running such ads this week. Executives tell Axios that more states will be running ads in the coming days.

Between the lines: Facebook is aiming to shore up election integrity on and off the platform. It has long pushed get-out-the-vote initiatives but has faced heavy criticism for its failure to catch election meddling on its platform in 2016.

  • Facebook already gives its employees paid time off to vote, on top of their other time off.
  • It also already includes a poll worker module within its Voting Information Center on Facebook and Instagram that connects people with more information about volunteering with their local election authorities.

The big picture: Other Big Tech companies are also pushing to expand poll worker efforts ahead of the election. Sources told Axios last month that Snapchat is rolling out new products and partnerships to drive poll worker sign-ups as well.

Go deeper: Big Tech pushes voter initiatives to counter misinformation

Go deeper

Nov 19, 2020 - Technology

Facebook says very few people actually see hate speech on its platform

Photo: Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Facebook said it took action on 22.1 million pieces of hate speech content to its platform globally last quarter and about 6.5 million pieces of hate speech content on Instagram. On both platforms, it says about 95% of that hate speech was proactively identified and stopped by artificial intelligence.

Details: In total, the company says that there are 10–11 views of hate speech for every 10,000 views of content uploaded to the site globally — or .1%. It calls this metric — how much problematic content it doesn't catch compared to how much is reported and removed — "prevalence."

2 hours ago - World

Iran confirms assassination of top nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadhe

The Iranian ministry of defense issued a statement on Friday confirming the assassination of Mohsen Fakhrizadhe, an Iranian scientist and the architect behind the Islamic Republic’s military nuclear program.

Why it matters: Fakhrizadhe was the head of the Amad project in the Iranian ministry of defense, which focused on developing a nuclear bomb until 2003.

U.K. to launch new watchdog next year to police digital giants

Photo: Muhammed Selim Korkutata/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

The U.K. government said on Friday that it will establish next year a Digital Markets Unit, which will enforce forthcoming "pro-competition" regulations aimed at curbing some of the digital platforms like Google and Facebook.

Why it matters: This is the latest move by a government to respond to growing objections to the size and power these companies have amassed.