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Examining evangelicalism in the age of Trump

President Trump delivers the commencement address at Liberty University in May. Photo: Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

Tim Keller —founder and Pastor Emeritus of the Redeemer Presbyterian Churches of New York City, and one of the nation's most celebrated evangelical pastors — writes a tough piece for The New Yorker that shot up the "Most Popular" list ... "Can Evangelicalism Survive Donald Trump and Roy Moore?":

The kicker: "People who once called themselves the 'Moral Majority' are now seemingly willing to vote for anyone, however immoral, who supports their political positions."

More from the piece:

  • "The disgust has come to include people within the movement itself. Earlier this month, Peter Wehner, an Op-Ed writer for the Times who served in the last three Republican Administrations, wrote a widely circulated piece entitled 'Why I Can No Longer Call Myself an Evangelical Republican.'"
  • "Many younger believers and Christians of color, who had previously identified with evangelicalism, have also declared their abandonment of the label. ... [N]ow, in popular usage, the word is nearly synonymous with 'hypocrite.'"
  • "When I used the word to describe myself in the nineteen-seventies, it meant I was not a fundamentalist. If I use the name today, however, it means to hearers that I am."
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