Apr 21, 2017

Ex-Googlers join startup to build machine-learning chip

Former engineers from Google's secretive, next-generation chip project — also known as the Tensor Processing Unit — have left to join a startup also focused on new silicon chips to power machine learning and artificial intelligence technologies, CNBC reports. The startup, called "Groq," was founded by Chamath Palihapitiya, a well-known Silicon Valley venture capital investor.

Why it matters: Today's chips aren't efficient or powerful enough to handle the increasing data-processing demands of advanced computing. Intel, Qualcomm and Nvidia are already creating their own chips that can process data more efficiently, and Google said this month that AI applications running on its TPUs run 15-30 times faster than contemporary processors.

Uphill battle: Creating a new breed of silicon chip is extremely capital intensive with research-and-development costs alone. And finding manufacturing partners to use untested chips over those made by established brands is a daunting task.

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#MeToo gets Weinstein

A man carries out Weinstein's walker. Photo: Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

Hollywood titan Harvey Weinstein is now a convicted rapist, two years and four months after accusations against him helped ignite the #MeToo movement.

Why it matters: To date, #MeToo has resulted in hundreds of powerful men losing their jobs. Seven have been criminally convicted, with four others still facing charges.

JPMorgan Chase to pull support for some fossil fuels

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

JPMorgan Chase said Monday that it won’t directly finance new oil and gas development in the Arctic and will significantly curtail its financing of the extraction and burning of coal.

Why it matters: JPMorgan is the world’s largest funder of fossil-fuel companies, according to a report by the Rainforest Action Network (RAN). The announcement follows similar moves by other big banks and investment firms, including Goldman Sachs and BlackRock.