Andrew Harnik / AP

Former Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson told the House Intelligence Committee Wednesday that there is no doubt Vladimir Putin ordered his government to hack the U.S. November election:

"In 2016 the Russian government, at the direction of Vladimir Putin himself, orchestrated cyber attacks on our nation for the purpose of influencing our election. That is a fact, plain and simple. Now, the key question for the president and congress is: What are we going to do to protect the American people and their democracy from this kind of thing in the future?"

Highlights:

  • Impact on outcome of election: "I know of no evidence that through cyber-intrusions, votes were altered or suppressed in some way."
  • Why didn't you reveal the interference? "One of the candidates, as you recall, was predicting that the election was going to be rigged," said Johnson, adding that DHS didn't want to inject themselves "into a very heated campaign."
  • Why didn't it make headlines then? Johnson said the news didn't get the attention it deserved last fall because Trump's Access Hollywood tape overshadowed it.
  • Any evidence of Trump campaign collusion? "Not beyond what has been out there, open-sourced, and not beyond anything this committee hasn't seen before."
  • Unprecedented: "The scope of this effort [by Russia] was unprecedented... In retrospect, it would be easy for me to say that I should have bought a sleeping bag and camped out in front of the DNC in late summer."
  • DNC could have done more to stop hack: Johnson said the DNC wasn't interested in help from DHS. "I recall very clearly that I was not pleased that we were not in there helping them patch this vulnerability."
  • Looking forward: Johnson urged Sec. Kelly to make cybersecurity a top priority. "It's going to worse before it gets better."

Go deeper

Biden raises $141 million more than Trump

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks during a September campaign event in Wilmington, Delaware. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Joe Biden's campaign, the Democratic National Committee and joint fundraising committees raised $466 million cash on hand, the presidential candidate's team announced late Sunday.

Why it matters: President Trump's campaign raised $325 million, his campaign communications director Tim Murtaugh announced Friday. In the spring, Biden was $187 million behind Trump and the Republican National Committee.

Driving the news: Slower spending by Biden's campaign and heavy spending by Trump's in the spring and record summer fund-raising hauls that spiked after he named Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) as his running mate contributed to the turnaround, notes the New York Times, which first reported the news.

Editor's note: This is a developing news story. Please check back for updates.

Virtual Emmys address chaotic year for American TV and society

Emmy Host Jimmy Kimmel during rehearsals Friday for the 72nd Annual Emmy Awards at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. Photo: Al Seib/ Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The Emmy Awards Sunday night addressed the major U.S. issues this year — including the protests on systemic racism and police brutality, the wildfires engulfing parts of the West Coast, the census, the pandemic, essential works and the election.

Why it matters: Award shows have always addressed wider cultural issues, but this year — amid unprecedented stress and uncertainty — that trend has accelerated.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 p.m. ET: 30,919,638 — Total deaths: 959,332— Total recoveries: 21,152,996Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30p.m. ET: 6,799,141 — Total deaths: 199,474 — Total recoveries: 2,590,671 — Total tests: 95,108,559Map.
  3. Politics: Testing czar on Trump's CDC contradictions: "Everybody is right" Ex-FDA chief: Career scientists won't be "easily cowed" by political vaccine pressure.
  4. Education: What we overlooked in the switch to remote learning.
  5. Health: The dwindling chances of eliminating COVID-19 — 7 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week.
  6. World: England sets £10,000 fine for breaking self-isolation rules — The countries painting their pandemic recoveries green.