As we found earlier this week in confidential internal plans, Trumpworld is preparing to gut the regulatory state, and at the top of the list is the Environmental Protection Agency.

A source inside the EPA took a quick picture of counseling sessions being advertised at the agency:

Alas. The classes are over. EPA spokeswoman Enesta Jones tells us the agency regularly offers training and other services. "This is just one of the more recent ones that were offered."

Why this matters: As we've noted before, there are a lot of career employees at the EPA who will be resistant to the administration's positions on climate change and the environment. They won't make it easy for Trump's political appointees to move quickly to implement changes.

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Updated 23 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 a.m. ET: 11,662,574 — Total deaths: 539,058 — Total recoveries — 6,336,732Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 a.m. ET: 2,948,397 — Total deaths: 130,430 — Total recoveries: 924,148 — Total tested: 36,032,329Map.
  3. Axios-Ipsos Coronavirus Index: Our response is becoming more polarized.
  4. Business: Breaking down the PPP disclosure debacle — Trump administration invests $2 billion in coronavirus drugs.
  5. World: Brazil's President Bolsonaro tests positive for coronavirus.
35 mins ago - World

Brazil's Bolsonaro tests positive for coronavirus

Photo: Andre Borges/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro announced Tuesday that he tested positive for coronavirus.

Why it matters: Brazil's coronavirus outbreak is one of the largest in the world, topped only by the U.S., and Bolsonaro has long downplayed the effects of the virus, pushing businesses to reopen over the last few months in order to jumpstart the country's economy.

Deutsche Bank pays New York $150 million for dealings with Jeffrey Epstein

Photo: Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

Deutsche Bank has agreed to pay the state of New York a $150 million penalty for "significant compliance failures" related to its dealings with now-dead convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, the State Department of Financial Services announced Tuesday.

Why it matters: Deutsche Bank "failed to properly monitor account activity conducted on behalf of the registered sex offender despite ample" public information about Epstein's criminal history, according to regulators. It's the first time any financial institution has been penalized for its dealings with Epstein.