Anthony Harvey/Getty Images for TechCrunch

Entrepreneur and investor Justin Kan said on Monday he's venturing out on his own after three years at Y Combinator, a prestigious startup accelerator program in Silicon Valley.

Through his new incubator, called Zero-F, he'll provide extremely hands-on guidance to nascent startups, with everything from assembling the initial team, to building the early prototypes, according to TechCrunch. The new venture already has three startups in its portfolio: Whale, a Q&A app; ScriptDash, an online pharmacy and delivery startup; and an undisclosed company in the legal industry.

"Y Combinator is excited to work with Justin as he launches Zero-F. He has been an amazing YC entrepreneur and mentor and we are confident that he will continue to help founders create billion startups for years to come," Y Combinator CEO Michael Siebel said in a statement.

The plan: Zero-F will add two or three new startups every year, according to TechCrunch. and will finance the entire thing himself without outside investors, and will put in between several hundred thousand and one million dollars to kick new projects off.

Track record: Kan has been quite successful as both entrepreneur and investor. His startup Justin.tv, an early take on live video broadcasting, eventually morphed into Twitch, the video game broadcasting company Amazon acquired for nearly $1 billion in 2014. He's also invested in companies like Cruise, which GM bought for nearly $1 billion.

The story has been updated with a statement from Y Combinator.

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