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L to R: Dennis Viollet, Bobby Charlton and Johnny Giles in 1960. Photo: Hutchinson/Mirrorpix/Getty Images

The union representing soccer players in England says that heading in training sessions "must be immediately restricted."

Why it matters: This comes amid growing concerns about brain injury diseases among former professional players.

  • Five of the 11 starters from England's 1966 Word Cup-winning team have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's or other neurodegenerative diseases.
  • That includes Bobby Charlton (pictured above), who was recently diagnosed with dementia, and his brother, Jack, who died after being diagnosed.

By the numbers: A 2019 study found former male professional soccer players were 3.5 times more likely to die from Alzheimer's, and other neurodegenerative diseases.

What they're saying: "In the short term, football [soccer] cannot carry on as it is," said PFA chief executive Gordon Taylor.

  • "There is a big issue here, and based on the increasing evidence available, it is clear we need to take immediate steps to monitor and reduce heading."
  • England manager Gareth Southgate recently said he fears getting dementia after his 18-year playing career, and former player Tony Cascarino went so far as to say that heading will be gone from the sport by 2040 (subscription).

The backdrop: In January, soccer officials in England, Northern Ireland and Scotland banned heading at practice for kids under 12, following the lead of the U.S. Soccer Federation, which in 2016 banned heading for kids under 11.

Go deeper: Why women's soccer players are worried about their brains (B/R)

Go deeper

Nov 29, 2020 - Sports

NBA announces new coronavirus protocols

The Los Angeles Lakers play the Miami Heat in Game Six of the 2020 NBA Finals. Photo: Douglas P. DeFelice/Getty Images

The NBA has laid out new coronavirus protocols, including restrictions on when players can return to play after testing positive for COVID-19, ESPN first reported Saturday.

Why it matters: The protocols, which must still be ratified by the league and the National Basketball Players Association, come as players prepare for training camps next week, AP notes. The preseason begins Dec. 11 and the 72-game regular-season starts Dec. 22.

Kaine, Collins' censure resolution seeks to bar Trump from holding office again

Sen. Tim Kaine (center) and Sen. Susan Collins (right). Photo: Andrew Harnik/Pool via Getty Images

Sens. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) are forging ahead with a draft proposal to censure former President Trump, and are considering introducing the resolution on the Senate floor next week.

Why it matters: Senators are looking for a way to condemn Trump on the record as it becomes increasingly unlikely Democrats will obtain the 17 Republican votes needed to gain a conviction, Axios Alayna Treene writes. "I think it’s important for the Senate's leadership to understand that there are alternatives," Kaine told CNN on Wednesday.

Stark reminder for America's corporate leaders

Rosalind "Roz" Brewer is about to become only the second Black woman to permanently lead a Fortune 500 company. She starts as Walgreens CEO on March 15.

Why it matters: It's a stark reminder of how far corporate America's top decision-makers have to go during an unprecedented push by politicians, employees and even a stock exchange to diversify their top ranks.

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