All Alternative energy stories

Denmark generated almost half of its electricity from wind in 2019

Wind turbines in the Baltic Sea. Photo: Patrick Pleul/picture alliance via Getty Images

Wind power accounted for a record 47% of the electricity consumed in Denmark in 2019, up from 41% in 2018 and 43% in 2017, Reuters reports.

Why it matters: The country’s grid operator Energinet said Thursday that cost reductions and improved offshore turbines contributed to the boost.

Go deeperArrowJan 2, 2020

Why U.S. homeowners consider going solar

Forty-six percent of U.S. homeowners say they have seriously considered installing solar panels at their homes, a new Pew Research Center poll shows.

Why it matters: It signals that the residential solar market has lots of room for growth. The survey notes that only 6% of homeowners polled have already installed systems — but the Solar Energy Industries Association's (SEIA) current estimate sits at 2.1%.

Go deeperArrowDec 20, 2019

PG&E electricity shut-offs drive Californians' interest in solar power

Photo: Andrew Aitchison/InPictures via Getty Images

The solar industry came out with new data yesterday showing record residential installations in the third quarter, edging out prior highs in 2016.

The intrigue: One part of the quarterly report that caught my eye confirms that PG&E's power shut-offs are driving interest in solar-plus-battery systems, though the real effect won't be known for a while.

Go deeperArrowDec 13, 2019

BP to provide Amazon with renewable electricity for European data centers

Photo: Thomas Samson/AFP/Getty Images

BP announced Wednesday that it will start providing Amazon with renewable electricity to fuel European data centers that power the tech giant's cloud platform.

Why it matters: Data centers are very energy thirsty, and account for a great deal of the tech sector's carbon emissions.

Go deeperArrowDec 5, 2019

Los Angeles launches low-carbon transportation plan

Data: International Council on Clean Transportation; Chart: Axios Visuals

Los Angeles officials and partners launched a low-carbon transportation plan that's aimed, among other things, at having electric vehicles account for 80% of vehicles sold and 30% of vehicles on the road in 2028.

Why it matters: The "roadmap" unveiled last week is the latest effort among major cities to move toward more climate-friendly transit options.

Go deeperArrowDec 2, 2019

How Democrats want to change the energy tax code

Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Richard Neal (D-Mass.). Photo: Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

House Democrats on the tax-writing Ways and Means Committee have unveiled draft legislation that would extend and/or expand a suite of tax credits for climate-friendly energy sources.

Why it matters: The tax code has historically been a driver of solar and wind power deployment, as well as electric vehicle sales, and much more.

Go deeperArrowNov 20, 2019

PG&E and the rise of "resilience culture"

A PG&E contractor works on utility poles. Photo: Philip Pacheco/AFP via Getty Images

PG&E will start cutting power Wednesday to about 150,000 customers in 18 California counties in the latest wave of preemptive blackouts to curb wildfire risks.

Why you'll hear about this again: The embattled utility will probably need to keep doing this for a long time. But the blackouts are just one force speeding the rise of what Shayle Kann of the VC firm Energy Impact Partners calls "resilience culture."

Go deeperArrowNov 20, 2019

Net-zero carbon pledges are still rare among energy companies

Despite some splashy pledges, the energy industry overall is just at the early stages of adopting "net-zero" carbon emissions plans, a new report shows.

Why it matters: Achieving global net-zero emissions by mid-century is a widely cited target in a steep uphill battle to meet the Paris agreement goal of limiting warming to 1.5 °C.

Go deeperArrowNov 14, 2019

The trouble with big power companies' net-zero pledges

S&P Global Market Intelligence has a great look at the pledges from big power companies — like Duke Energy, Xcel Energy, PSEG — to reach net-zero emissions or 100% zero-carbon generation by 2050.

The problem: The companies don't really know how they'll get all the way there without significant increased development and scaling of technologies like "carbon capture and sequestration, advanced nuclear reactors and battery storage" — and that's likely to need help from the federal government.

Go deeper: Industry giants propose path to "net-zero" carbon emissions

Keep ReadingArrowNov 13, 2019

The mammoth gap between energy trends and climate goals

Climate protestors outside Congress. Photo: John Lamparski/Getty Images

Existing and announced policies worldwide won't be nearly enough to rein in carbon emissions, despite the strong growth of climate-friendly energy sources, according to a new report from the International Energy Agency.

Why it matters: The IEA's annual World Energy Outlook reports are among the most prominent attempts to model where energy systems are headed in the decades ahead. These big and data-rich studies (this year's weighs in at 810 pages) are widely cited by policymakers, analysts and other stakeholders.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Nov 13, 2019