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Photo: Eugene Tanner / AFP / Getty Images

The false missile alert set off in Hawaii earlier this month has led to the resignation of emergency management administrator Vern Miyagi and the firing of the employee who sent the warning, according to the AP.

The moves come after the Federal Communications Commission said Tuesday that the employee who sent the alert claimed to have believed the threat was real. A recording that was played as part of a drill during a shift changeover accidentally included the words, "this is not a drill," according to the regulator.

The bottom line: The FCC said that a "lack of preparation" led to Hawaii's 38-minute delay to correct a false alert that said a ballistic missile was headed towards the state. And they said the alert was sent in the first place because of a "combination of human error and inadequate safeguards."

The FCC produced a detailed timeline of Hawaii officials' 38-minute long scramble to contain their error:

  • 8:05 a.m. in Hawaii: A midnight shift supervisor for the state's Emergency Management Agency initiates a drill for the warning officers on duty during the day. A recording played as part of the drill includes language to indicate it was an exercise, but also includes the language "this is not a drill" as part of the text of a live alert.
  • The FCC reports that at this point, some of the officers on duty realized it was a drill. One officer, however, claims they believed it to be a real emergency.
  • 8:07 a.m.: That officer clicks "yes" when asked, "Are you sure that you want to send this Alert?" The message is sent.
  • 8:08 a.m.: The officer gets the false alert on their phone.
  • 8:09 a.m.: The governor is informed about the false alert. Other authorities are told a minute later.
  • 8:12 a.m.: The agency cancels the alert, five minutes after it was sent.
  • 8:20 a.m.: The emergency agency posts on Facebook and Twitter that there is no missile threat to the state.
  • 8:27 a.m.: Authorities decide how to correct their error using the alert system. Three minutes later FEMA, which runs the system, agrees.
  • 8:45 a.m.: Hawaii's Emergency Management Agency sends its correction, 38 minutes after the false alert was sent.

Go deeper: Learn more about how the alert system works.

Go deeper

CDC to cut guidance on quarantine period for coronavirus exposure

A health care worker oversees cars as people arrive to get tested for coronavirus at a testing site in Arlington, Virginia, on Tuesday. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The CDC will soon shorten its guidance for quarantine periods following exposure to COVID-19, AP reported Tuesday and Axios can confirm.

Why it matters: Quarantine helps prevent the spread of the coronavirus, which can occur before a person knows they're sick or if they're infected without feeling any symptoms. The current recommended period to stay home if exposed to the virus is 14 days. The CDC plans to amend this to 10 days or seven with a negative test, an official told Axios.

  • The CDC did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
1 hour ago - Health

CDC panel: COVID vaccines should go to health workers, long-term care residents first

Hospital staff work in the COVID-19 intensive care unit in Houston. Photo: Go Nakamura via Getty

Health-care workers and nursing home residents should be at the front of the line to get coronavirus vaccines in the United States once they’re cleared and available for public use, an independent CDC panel recommended in a 13-1 emergency vote on Tuesday, per CNBC.

Why it matters: Recent developments in COVID-19 vaccines have accelerated the timeline for distribution as vaccines developed by Pfizer and Moderna undergo the federal approval process. States are preparing to begin distributing as soon as two weeks from now.

Obama: Broad slogans like "defund the police" lose people

Snapchat.

Former President Barack Obama told Peter Hamby on the Snapchat original political show "Good Luck America" that "snappy" slogans such as "defund the police" can alienate people, making the statements less effective than intended.

What he's saying: "You lost a big audience the minute you say it, which makes it a lot less likely that you're actually going to get the changes you want done," Obama told Hamby in an interview that will air Wednesday morning at 6 a.m. EST on Snapchat.