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Bird scooters at a maintenance facility in France. Photo: Gerard Julien/AFP via Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo vetoed Thursday a bill that would have legalized electric scooters and throttle-controlled electric bikes across the state, citing safety concerns, including the lack of a helmet requirement.

Why it matters: New York has been a holdout amid the scooter craze over the last two years — despite it being a prime market for the vehicles. The bill overwhelmingly passed the state legislature last summer.

  • The bill would have legalized the vehicles across the state, requiring even New York City to give up its blanket ban, but would allow municipalities to regulate specifics, including permits for rental companies like Bird, Lime, Uber and Lyft.
  • While pedal-assisted e-bikes, whose motors only kick in while the rider is pedaling, have been legal in NYC, throttle-controlled ones have not, forcing many delivery workers who prefer them to do their jobs, to pay fines and risk having them confiscated.
  • The bill would also ban e-scooter rentals from Manhattan, but would allow people to ride scooters they own.

Go deeper: The side effects of the transportation revolution

Go deeper

Microwave energy likely behind illnesses of American diplomats in Cuba and China

Personnel at the U.S. Embassy in Cuba in Havana in 2017, after the State Department announced plans to halve the embassy's staff following mysterious health problems affecting over 20 people associated with the U.S. embassy. Photo: Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images

A radiofrequency energy of radiation that includes microwaves likely caused American diplomats in China and Cuba to fall ill with neurological symptoms over the past four years, a report published Saturday finds.

Why it matters: The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine's report doesn't attribute blame for the suspected attacks, but it notes there "was significant research in Russia/USSR into the effects of pulsed, rather than continuous wave [radiofrequency] exposures" and military personnel in "Eurasian communist countries" were exposed to non-thermal radiation.

Georgia governor declines Trump's request to help overturn election result

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp pushed back on Saturday after President Trump pressed him to help overturn the state's election results.

Driving the news: Trump asked the Republican governor over the phone Saturday to call a special legislative session aimed at overturning the presidential election results in Georgia, per the Washington Post. Kemp refused.