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Photo: Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

Commercial vans are emerging as a key growth area for electrification — and General Motors is developing a vehicle for the sector, according to a Reuters report.

Why it matters: GM's interest shows how a powerful legacy automaker wants in on what Morgan Stanley analysts called "America's hottest new vehicle" in a research note this week.

  • "Delivery vans have highly predictable routes, conduct high-value services, operate a high utilization and generally stay within a specific geographic area … all of which fits well with EV infrastructure and charging ecosystems which enable their full economic use," they write.

The intrigue: The fledgeling battery-powered van market, like other EV segments, includes both startups and giant automakers.

  • Amazon, in late 2019, vowed to buy 100,000 electric delivery vehicles from the startup Rivian and hopes to have 10,000 operating as soon as 2022.
  • Ford announced in March that it's developing an electric version of its Ford Transit cargo van.
  • UPS is planning to buy at least 10,000 electric vans from the U.K. startup Arrival.

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Sep 8, 2020 - Energy & Environment

Uber vows big expansion of electric rides

Photo: Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Uber is immediately expanding its "Green" program to new cities and setting a longer-term target of having fully electric cars account for 100% of rides on its platform in the U.S., Canadian and European cities by 2030.

Why it matters: Those plans — and other new climate pledges Uber unveiled Tuesday — come as ride-hailing firms face growing scrutiny over their carbon emissions amid evidence they're cannibalizing public transit and increasing congestion.

58 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inhofe loudly sets Trump straight on defense bill

Sen. Jim Inhofe speaks with reporters in the Capitol last month. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Senator Jim Inhofe told President Trump today he'll likely fail to get two big wishes in pending defense spending legislation, bellowing into his cellphone: "This is the only chance to get our bill passed," a source who overheard part of their conversation tells Axios.

Why it matters: Republicans are ready to test whether Trump's threats of vetoing the bill, which has passed every year for more than half a century, are empty.

Conspiracy theories blow back on Trump's White House

Sidney Powell. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

President Trump has rarely met a conspiracy theory he doesn't like, but he and other Republicans now worry the wild tales told by lawyers Sidney Powell and Lin Wood may cost them in Georgia's Senate special elections.

Why it matters: The two are telling Georgians not to vote for Republicans David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler because of a bizarre, baseless and potentially self-defeating theory: It's not worth voting because the Chinese Communist Party has rigged the voting machines.