Dec 18, 2019

Judge grants government rights to proceeds from Snowden book, speeches

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

A federal judge ruled Wednesday that the government is entitled to any proceeds from speeches and a book authored by National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden, the Washington Post reports.

The big picture: Snowden is currently living under asylum in Russia after the government unsealed espionage charges against him in 2013 for leaking classified information. The Justice Department has argued that its inability to prosecute Snowden justifies halting the royalties he's reaped from what may be the largest security breach in U.S. history, per the Post.

  • Snowden argues that he is not revealing new information in his public speeches, and that the government never would have reviewed his manuscript "in a good faith and timely fashion."
  • Snowden has said he would like to return to the U.S. but only if he is allowed to defend himself in a trial by arguing that he acted in the public's best interest. That defense is not permitted in U.S. courts.

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Trump administration will deport Mexican asylum-seekers to Guatemala

More than 1,000 Mexican migrants had been waiting for weeks, some for months, for a chance to file for asylum in the U.S. Photo: Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. will begin sending Mexican asylum-seekers to Guatemala to wait out their cases instead of allowing them to remain in the U.S., according to documents obtained by BuzzFeed News.

Why it matters: The Trump administration had previously implemented a "remain in Mexico" policy for asylum-seekers from Central America, but international law forbids asylum-seekers from being sent back to their home country due to concerns they may face prosecution. Mexicans account for more than half of the estimated 21,000 asylum seekers waiting along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Go deeperArrowJan 6, 2020

Trump retweets supporter, naming purported Ukraine whistleblower

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump has retweeted the name of the alleged Ukraine whistleblower on his Twitter feed.

Why it matters: It and a retweet of a Washington Examiner post that also named the purported whistleblower marked the first time Trump has actively promoted the name, despite the fact that some of his allies, including son Donald Trump Jr. have repeatedly done so online.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Dec 28, 2019

Mexicans make up half of asylum seekers at southern border

Photo: Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images

Mexicans account for more than half of the estimated 21,000 asylum seekers waiting along the U.S.-Mexico border, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Why it matters: The increase in Mexican asylum seekers poses a particular challenge to the Trump administration and its "Remain in Mexico" policy, which requires Central American refugee seekers to remain in Mexico while they await their hearings. It can't apply to Mexicans since international law bans sending people back to the country where they may face persecution.

Go deeperArrowDec 26, 2019