All Trade war stories

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
May 5, 2020 - Economy & Business

American concern about tariffs hits new record high

Data: CivicScience; Chart: Axios Visuals

Concern about President Trump's tariffs on U.S. imports of Chinese goods hit its highest level on record in April, as the coronavirus pandemic caused more Americans to fear the their' impact on household finances, according to the latest survey from CivicScience.

Where it stands: The tariffs remain a massive tax on American businesses and individuals at a time when Congress and the Federal Reserve are expending trillions of dollars to offset the negative economic shock of the virus.

Mar 21, 2020 - Health

Report: Drop in medical supplies tied to decreased China imports

Photo: Rich Graessle/Icon Sportswire/Getty Images

An AP report finds that the shortage of medical supplies in the United States correlated with the drop in imports, mainly from China.

Why it matters: Emergency rooms, hospitals, and clinics are starting to run out of key supplies needed to protect health care officials and test potentially sick individuals, AP notes.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
Mar 11, 2020 - Economy & Business

The trade war could weaken U.S. coronavirus response

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams looks on as President Donald Trump speaks during a press briefing with the White House Coronavirus Task Force. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images.

As the Trump administration mulls its plan to battle the impact of COVID-19 on the U.S. economy, scant attention has been given to a major source of potential stimulus: reining in its tariffs on China.

Why it matters: U.S. tariffs increase costs for American companies that import Chinese goods, and with fewer customers making purchases as the COVID-19 outbreak slows demand, the trade war "is going to be a bigger drag on the economy," Chad P. Bown, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics (PIIE), tells Axios.chevron.

Pence: "We'll see" if U.K.'s Huawei decision threatens trade deal

Photo: Antonio Masiello/Getty Images

Vice President Mike Pence told CNBC Friday that "we'll see" if the U.K.'s decision to allow Chinese telecom firm Huawei to build part of its 5G network will impact forthcoming trade talks between the U.S. and U.K.

Why it matters: Striking a trade deal with the U.S. is one of Prime Minister Boris Johnson's top priorities post-Brexit.

China to cut tariffs on $75 billion of U.S. goods

Chinese Vice Premier Liu He and President Trump at the White House on Jan. 15. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

China will halve tariffs on about $75 billion of imports from the U.S., effective Feb. 14, the country's finance ministry said in statements posted to its website Thursday.

Why it matters: This is another sign of tensions easing in the prolonged trade war between the U.S. and China that's brought major uncertainty to the markets and hurt the U.S. manufacturing industry and farmers.

Macron and Trump call ceasefire on digital taxes and wine tariffs

Macron and Trump on Dec. 3, 2019. Photo: Ludovic Marin/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

French President Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday tweeted that he and President Trump held a “great discussion” on a tax on digital services considered by Paris and pledged to work on "a good agreement" with Washington "to avoid tariff escalation."

Why it matters: Macron and Trump agreed to avoid increasing tariffs and continue negotiations on the digital tax during until the end of the year, CNBC reports.

Gary Cohn says Trump tariffs on China "totally hurt the United States"

President Trump's former chief economic adviser Gary Cohn said on CBS's "Face the Nation" Sunday that he thinks the president's tariffs on China "totally" hurt the United States, and that he doesn't believe they have helped achieve a different "outcome" with China.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Jan 16, 2020 - Economy & Business

"Phase one" trade deal could spur Chinese purchases of U.S. energy

The newly inked "phase one" U.S.-China trade deal calls for China to boost purchases of U.S. energy products — including crude oil and liquified natural gas (LNG) — by $52.4 billion over the next two years.

Why it matters: China is the world's largest oil importer and second-largest LNG consumer.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
Jan 16, 2020 - Economy & Business

The "phase one" deal isn't all that it seems

Vice Premier Liu He and President Trump after signing phase one Wednesday. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

There was limited fanfare from the stock market after President Trump and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He signed the "phase one" trade deal yesterday.

What happened: The 94-page document will roll back some U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods and see China increase purchases of U.S. goods and services by $200 billion over two years, but it leaves more questions than answers, experts say.

U.S. and China sign "phase one" trade agreement

Chinese Vice Premier Liu He and President Trump at the signing ceremony. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He signed Wednesday the "phase one" trade deal between the U.S. and China.

The big picture: The 18-month trade war between the two countries has largely lacked significant breakthroughs, causing major market uncertainty and hammering the U.S. manufacturing industry. This reprieve — which will take effect in 30 days — could help that sector to rebound this year.