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Investors remain wary despite Dow's historic single-day gain

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The Dow rose more than 11% to clock its largest single-day gain since 1933 on Tuesday, but few are confident the market is set for a sustained rebound. Experts are urging tempered enthusiasm with U.S. and global equities on pace for a rare second day of gains.

What they're saying: "You’re going to see movement in the market, extremes in both directions, that have nothing to do with any of the headlines necessarily, but just the nature of the beast at this stage in the bear market," Liz Ann Sonders, chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab, tells Axios.

Stocks soar 9% as Congress nears coronavirus stimulus deal

Photo: Luiz Roberto Lima-ANB/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Stocks closed up more than 9% on Tuesday, marking yet another day of huge moves in the stock market amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Driving the news: Congressional leaders signaled that they're close to striking a deal on a massive stimulus package that will soften the blow for businesses and consumers as the pandemic threatens an unprecedented halt in economic activity.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Mar 24, 2020 - Economy & Business

Stock market tumbles as coronavirus stimulus hangs in limbo

Exterior of the New York Stock Exchange, which closed the trading floor today. Photo: Angela Weiss via AFP

Stocks closed down about 3% on Monday, though they finished above the lowest levels of the day.

By the numbers: The S&P 500 joined the Dow in shedding all the gains since President Trump's inauguration in 2017, a nod to how steep the market drop has been in an extremely short period of time.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Mar 23, 2020 - Economy & Business

Podcast: Keeping the stock markets open amid coronavirus

As stocks plummet, there have been calls to close the markets. But the counter-argument is that it would starve companies of capital and make it impossible for investors to liquidate their assets during the coronavirus outbreak. Dan digs in with Tal Cohen, the Nasdaq's head of North American markets.

Go deeper: Fed unveils aggressive measures

The story behind Ron Johnson's stock sale

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Staff

Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) was one of several senators who came under fire last week after disclosing that they had sold large amounts of stock just before large swaths of the American economy shut down due to the coronavirus outbreak.

The big picture: Many of Johnson's colleagues should indeed be scrutinized by the SEC and/or the Department of Justice, but Johnson himself hasn't done anything worthy of investigation.

Fed unveils aggressive measures to shore up economy

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The Federal Reserve announced a broad slate of programs to make sure credit flows to businesses and consumers as coronavirus safety measures cripple the economy.

Why it matters: The Fed’s announcement early Monday is the most aggressive step so far this year — and the markets responded in kind, with futures rising steeply ahead of the market's open.

Stocks drop 4% to end worst week since 2008

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Stocks closed more than 4% lower on Friday, with the S&P 500 shedding 4.3%, the Dow dropping 4.6% (or 927 points), and the Nasdaq falling 3.7%.

Why it matters: It caps a bruising week for Wall Street — you'd have to go back to 2008 to see worse losses — as the coronavirus outbreak forces more of the world's biggest economies to shut down.

Burr asks Senate Ethics Committee to open probe into his stock trades

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Senate Intelligence Chairman Richard Burr (R-N.C.) asked the Senate Ethics Committee on Friday to review his recent stock sell-offs.

What he's saying: Burr claimed that the trades, which came before the market crashed amid coronavirus fears, occurred because he "closely followed CNBC's daily health and science reporting out of its Asia bureaus at the time."

Biden calls on CEOs to refrain from stock buybacks amid coronavirus bailouts

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Joe Biden called on CEOs on Friday to make a commitment against stock buybacks, as the country deals with the coronavirus pandemic.

Why it matters: The demand comes as an increasing number of industries have called for economic relief from the effects of the pandemic. Companies in many of those industries have come under fire for using extra funds from tax relief to repurchase their own shares in recent years.

The Trump administration's 180 on stock buybacks

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President Trump told reporters on Thursday he would be "OK" with a conditional coronavirus bailout that bans stock buybacks for companies that receive federal relief.

Why it matters: Trump's tax cuts set off a record-setting buyback spree in corporate America. The comments are a shift in tone, given that his deputies have defended share repurchases in the past.