Jobs

The big picture

What economists expect from the August jobs report

The Fed wants to know if the U.S. labor market has made “substantial further progress.”

Aug 30, 2021 - Economy & Business
New survey shows companies are open to moving to cheaper locales

Remote work — accelerated by the pandemic — has made it easier for companies to seek out less expensive regions

Jan 19, 2021 - Economy & Business
How the pandemic will reshape the job market

Some lost jobs will never come back.

Jun 23, 2020 - Economy & Business
Coronavirus could upend traditional workweeks

And working parents could hugely benefit.

Jun 16, 2020 - Economy & Business
What offices might look like as America returns to work

Say goodbye to snack jars and office gyms.

Jun 16, 2020 - Economy & Business
A reckoning for small business

Millions of businesses might not survive — and many of the tens of millions of jobs they support could evaporate.

May 23, 2020 - Economy & Business

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Survey: Most Latino professionals feel overlooked for promotions

Data: YouGov on behalf of LinkedIn; Chart: Axios Visuals

Half of U.S. Latinos feel their workplace does not have a nurturing environment for diverse professionals, even as a majority think their office leaders do consider inclusion to be important, per a poll carried out by YouGov and LinkedIn.

By the numbers: The survey found that 37% of Latino professionals said they are considering leaving their jobs because of lack of recognition, of opportunities and of leaders with shared experiences who can offer mentorship.

Corporations turn focus to retaining frontline workers

Illustration: Shoshana Gordon/Axios

Companies are narrowing the blue- and white-collar experience as they're forced to adapt to a worker-led market.

Driving the news: Basic office tools and concepts like corporate communications and schedule flexibility are migrating to frontline operations through investments in technology.

D.C.'s building boom grinds to a halt

Illustration: Brendan Lynch/Axios

The decades-long building boom that remade Washington D.C. is screeching to a halt, undone by broader construction trends and the legacy of the post-pandemic workplace.

Why it matters: Dizzying construction has reshaped the city, reinvigorated downtown and created bustling new communities. 

D.C.'s RAMMY Awards drive home COVID's existential restaurant disruption

Fiola Mare's dining igloos, as seen in December. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Restaurant awards — usually a celebration of excess — are suddenly a salute to survival.

  • This year's RAMMY Awards, from the Restaurant Association of Metropolitan Washington, were grounded in adversity and disruption, rather than luxury or decadence.

The new COVID-inspired categories highlight how the pandemic's existential threat forever changed the industry.

  • "Chef of the year" was ditched for more inclusive categories.
Sep 20, 2021 - Economy & Business

The pandemic made our workweeks longer

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

The average American's workweek has gotten 10% longer during the pandemic, according to a new Microsoft study published in Nature Human Behaviour.

Why it matters: These longer hours are a key part of the pandemic-induced crisis of burnout at U.S. firms — and workers are quitting in droves.

Income-sharing agreements on a quest for legitimacy

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Income-sharing agreements (ISAs) were hatched more than 60 years ago by Milton Friedman, but the financing instrument is still trying to establish its legitimacy.

Why it matters: ISAs, which let borrowers get cash upfront and repay it later via a portion of their future earnings, have been hailed as a solution to the college debt crisis.

States that ended COVID unemployment benefits see no boost in job growth

Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

States that ended federal unemployment benefits earlier this summer saw August job growth at less than half the rate of states that retained the benefits, according to new data released Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Why it matters: Leaders in the largely Republican-led states had insisted that the benefits were discouraging people from work, and ended the assistance program early ahead of its planned expiration on Sept. 6.

Sep 14, 2021 - Economy & Business

What young people want from their employers

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Workers increasingly want their companies to think bigger than profits and speak up on social issues — and it's younger employees driving the trend.

The big picture: As the next generation enters the workforce, companies will have to devote even more time and resources to tackling issues like systemic racism, income inequality and climate change.

Tech's double-edged sword in the job market

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Technology that automates recruiting and hiring can be partly to blame for the current labor shortage, according to a new Harvard Business School and Accenture study.

Driving the news: More than 90% of employers in the U.S., U.K, and Germany surveyed said that they use automated systems to filter or rank candidates first. Those systems often eliminate candidates that could be a good fit for jobs with training, but whose resumes don’t precisely match the pre-set criteria.

Workers are worried about COVID

COVID concerns are keeping a growing number of Americans out of the labor market.

Why it matters: The wave of Delta variant infections over the past two months has renewed worker fears, which threatens to exacerbate ongoing labor shortages.

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