First use of flavored e-cigarettes, cigars, hookah, and smokeless tobacco products can place young adults and adults at risk of regular tobacco use. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Youths and young adults are likely to continue using various tobacco products after trying flavored products like menthol or mint, according to a new study from JAMA Network.

Driving the news: Popular e-cigarette startup Juul announced last week a halt in its flavored vape products, signaling further cooperation with the FDA. Juul banned all flavors except mint, its most popular flavor.

The big picture: The study notes that all flavored tobacco products are at fault of being a gateway to regular use, not just e-cigarettes.

  • First use of flavored e-cigarettes, cigars, hookah and smokeless tobacco products can place young adults and adults at risk of regular tobacco use.
  • There's a significant association between first use of a menthol or mint flavored cigarette and continued cigarette use across all age groups.

Background: Last year, the FDA planned a proposal to ban the sale of menthol cigarettes and flavored cigars. This year, many city and state legislatures are joining the effort to ban flavored e-cigarettes.

  • Preliminary results from a Centers for Disease Control study showed nearly 28% of high school students reported using an e-cigarette last August, a 7-point bump from 2018.
  • Fruit, menthol and mint flavors were by far the most popular flavors, with more than 60% of teen vapers acknowledging that they had used them, per the CDC.

Noteworthy: The Food and Drug Administration concluded Tuesday that completely switching from traditional cigarettes to eight "General Snus" smokeless tobacco products does lower certain health risks.

  • The public is still divided over whether outlawing flavored e-cigarettes or all e-cigarettes is a good idea, according to data from Kaiser Family Foundation.

Go deeper: Regulatory gaps are exacerbating the youth vaping crisis

Go deeper

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10:30 a.m. ET: 20,388,408 — Total deaths: 743,599— Total recoveries: 12,616,973Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10:30 a.m. ET: 5,150,590 — Total deaths: 164,681 — Total recoveries: 1,714,960 — Total tests: 63,252,257Map.
  3. Business: U.S. already feeling effects of ending unemployment benefits — U.S. producer prices rose last month by the most since October 2018.
  4. Public health: America is flying blind on its coronavirus response.

Trump congratulates QAnon conspiracy theorist on GOP runoff win

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President Trump on Wednesday tweeted congratulations to Marjorie Taylor Greene, a vocal QAnon conspiracy theorist who won the Republican nomination in Georgia's deep-red 14th Congressional District runoff.

Why it matters: The president's approval illustrates how the once-fringe conspiracy theory has gained ground within the GOP. Greene is among the at least 11 GOP candidates for Congress who have openly supported or defended the QAnon movement or some of its tenets, per Axios' Jacob Knutson.

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What Kamala Harris means for Biden's climate change plans

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Joshua Lott/Stringer.

Sen. Kamala Harris' VP selection could heighten the ticket's focus on environmental justice while prompting fresh Trump campaign political attacks on Democrats' energy plans.

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