Amgen, Eli Lilly, Merck and the Association of National Advertisers are suing the Trump administration over its rule forcing pharmaceutical companies to display drugs' list prices in TV commercials.

Context: They say the rule violates the First Amendment and exceeds the government's authority.

The big picture: Experts expected drugmakers to file such a lawsuit — even though the new regulation isn't expected to actually affect drug pricing.

What they're saying: The drug companies argue in their complaint that the rule would have a "misleading effect," because the sticker prices would not represent what patients themselves have to pay.

  • The companies also say the regulation violates their First Amendment rights.
  • Amgen said the rule would not address what most patients want to know: what their out-of-pocket costs will be.

Between the lines: The rule itself is pretty small potatoes, but the lawsuit shows the self-interested goals of each party.

  • The Trump administration likes the rule because it's a talking point to say they are doing something about drug prices, despite federal officials admitting it would have negligible effects on patients and drug spending.
  • Pharmaceutical manufacturers don't like the rule because it might discourage patients from buying their products. Instead, the companies like to promote how insured patients can get their drugs for free or at a low cost through drug copay cards — which economists agree raise costs and allow drugmakers to charge higher prices.

Go deeper: New rule on drug prices is asking for lawsuits — literally

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Updated 48 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

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  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 6 p.m. ET: 3,407,798 — Total deaths: 136,252 — Total recoveries: 1,031,939 — Total tested: 41,004,275Map.
  3. Politics: Biden welcomes Trump wearing mask in public but warns "it’s not enough"
  4. Public health: Four former CDC heads say Trump's undermining of agency puts lives at risk — CDC director: U.S. could get coronavirus "under control" in 4–8 weeks if all wear masks.

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JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon. Photo: J. Lawler Duggan/For The Washington Post via Getty Images

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Moderna's stock rose 16% after hours on this news. Photo: Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Healthy volunteers who took Moderna's coronavirus vaccine candidate appeared to generate an immune system response to the virus, and there were "no trial-limiting safety concerns," according to a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Why it matters: The phase one trial is still small and does not definitively determine how effective the vaccine is. But Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health, which is running the trial, told the Wall Street Journal that these data make it "pretty clear that this vaccine is capable of inducing quite good [levels] of neutralizing antibodies."