SaveSave story

Dropbox files for an IPO

Photo: Jaap Arriens / NurPhoto via Getty Images

Dropbox, a file storage and sharing company, has filed for a $500 million initial public offering.

  • Offering details: The San Francisco-based company plans to trade on the NASDAQ under ticker symbol DBX, with Goldman Sachs listed as left lead underwriter.
  • Financials: Dropbox is not profitable yet. It reported net losses of $210.2 million and $111.7 million in fiscal 2016 and 2017, respectively. Dropbox brought in $844.8 million in revenue during the fiscal year of 2016, and $1.1 billion in fiscal 2017.

Business numbers:

  • More than 500 million registered users, in more than 180 countries—though it double-counts people who have multiple separate accounts.
  • 11 million paying users, up from 8.8 million in 2016, and 6.5 million in 2015 (same note as above).
  • Average revenue per paying user (ARPU): $111.91 in 2017, up from $110.54 in 2016, and down from $113.54.
  • 90% of its revenue is from self-serve channels.
  • More than 500,000 developers had registered and built applications using Dropbox's tech as of Dec. 2017.

Backers: Dropbox has raised more than $1.7 billion in venture capital and debt financing, and was most recently valued at about $10 billion. Its major backers include Sequoia Capital, Accel, T. Roe Price, and Green Bay Ventures.

The story has been updated with more information.

Mike Allen 5 hours ago
SaveSave story

Why Trump added a streetfighter to his legal team

Screenshot via Fox News

A new addition to President Trump's legal team — Joe diGenova, a former U.S. attorney who is well-known in Washington and has argued for the president on Fox News — reflects three White House realities.

The state of play: (1) The White House is digging in for a fight that looks to be longer and messier than officials had expected. (2) This is another example of the president responding to televised cues. Trump has spent most of his adult life in litigation, and obsesses about legal positioning in the same way that he is consumed by his press coverage. (3) It's another pugilistic voice at the table, and suggests that this weekend's attacks on Mueller won't be the last.

SaveSave story

Facebook reaches a tipping point

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios 

Of all the news crises Facebook has faced during the past year, the Cambridge Analytica scandal is playing out to be the worst and most damaging.

Why it matters: It's not that the reports reveal anything particularly new about how Facebook's back end works — developers have understood the vulnerabilities of Facebook's interface for years. But stakeholders crucial to the company's success — as well as the public seem less willing to listen to its side of the story this time around.