Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The inconceivable is conceivable: After a few crazy months, drones are among the worries on the FBI's radar ahead of the Super Bowl in Atlanta, the AP reports.

Driving the news: "The sky above the stadium that will host Sunday’s Super Bowl is being 'inundated' with an alarming number of drones, raising the specter of injuries to tourists or others — or a possible collision with aircraft, the FBI said."

Why it matters: As we've seen at airports like Gatwick and Newark, even reports of drones can stretch law enforcement thin and inject fresh peril into already-fraught situations.

  • Imagine the nightmare if they have to delay or pause the Super Bowl because of some idiot with a drone.

What they're saying:

  • “[W]e have no idea if [a drone in the air is] friendly, or if it’s someone who has nefarious plans and it’s weaponized," FBI spokesman Kevin Rowson told the AP.
  • “It has taken up a lot of time for our agents and for law enforcement officers to be targeting these drones when they could be working on other security measures,” he said.
  • “A drone impact with a fixed-wing aircraft or a helicopter would be catastrophic,” said FBI Special Agent John Cronier.

Be smart: Don't fly drones over the Super Bowl.

Go deeper: The drone nightmare is here

Go deeper

The COVID-19 learning cliff

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Perhaps the most jarring reality of the COVID-19 pandemic for families has been the sudden and dramatic disruption to all levels of education, which is expected to have deep social and economic repercussions for years — if not decades — to come.

Why it matters: As millions of students are about to start the school year virtually, at least in part, experts fear students may fall off an educational cliff — missing key academic milestones, falling behind grade level and in some cases dropping out of the educational system altogether.

Postal slowdown threatens election breakdown

In 24 hours, signs of a pre-election postal slowdown have moved from the shadows to the spotlight, with evidence emerging all over the country that this isn't a just a potential threat, but is happening before our eyes.

Why it matters: If you're the Trump administration, and you're in charge of the federal government, remember that a Pew poll published in April found the Postal Service was viewed favorably by 91% of Americans.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 21,280,608 — Total deaths: 767,422— Total recoveries: 13,290,879Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 5,335,398 — Total deaths: 168,903 — Total recoveries: 1,796,326 — Total tests: 65,676,624Map.
  3. Health: The coronavirus-connected heart ailment that could lead to sudden death in athletes — Patients grow more open with their health data during pandemic.
  4. States: New York to reopen gyms, bowling alleys, museums.
  5. Podcasts: The rise of learning podsSpecial ed under pressure — Not enough laptops — The loss of learning.