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Seagulls fly past the skyline of midtown Manhattan as the sun rises behind Hudson Yards and the Empire State Building. Photo: Gary Hershorn/Getty Images

Just 9.8% of Americans moved between 2018 and 2019, per housing data out Wednesday — the lowest percentage since the Census Bureau started keeping track of statistics in 1948, the New York Times first reported.

Why it matters: The data indicates the United States population is "aging, and older people are much less likely to move than younger people. But even younger people are moving less than before," the Times notes.

By the numbers: About 29% of people aged 20 to 24 years old moved between 2005 and 2006. That number is about 20% today, William Frey, a senior demographer at the Brookings Institution told the Times.

The big picture: "When factories would close, workers would move to other parts of the country to find jobs in new ones," the Times writes. "Young people flocked to cities and rapidly growing suburbs, where jobs were plentiful and rent was cheap."

Driving the news: A combination of low-wage jobs and rising rent prices in large cities have contributed to the housing stagnation, the Times notes.

  • Meanwhile, housing affordability has proven to be a stumbling block for older Americans' access to retirement, while those who own homes are more inclined to stay put.
  • There's a growing trend of seniors remaining in their homes instead of seeking senior housing — leaving developers with a glut of empty buildings, per the Wall Street Journal.
  • Frey said the situation is "also a continued effect of the Great Recession. Slowdowns in the housing and job markets and delays in marriage and childbearing pushed their relocation rates down substantially."

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Mayors press Biden to adopt progressive immigration agenda

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A coalition of nearly 200 mayors and county executives is challenging Joe Biden and the incoming Congress to adopt a progressive immigration agenda that would give everyone a pathway to citizenship.

Why it matters: The group's goals, set out in a white paper released today, seem to fall slightly to the left of what the president-elect plans to propose on Inauguration Day — though not far — and come at a time of intense national polarization over immigration.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
13 mins ago - Health

Demand for coronavirus vaccines is outstripping supply

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Now that nearly half of the U.S. population could be eligible for coronavirus vaccines, America is facing the problem experts thought we’d have all along: demand for the vaccine is outstripping supply.

Why it matters: The Trump administration’s call for states to open up vaccine access to all Americans 65 and older and adults with pre-existing conditions may have helped massage out some bottlenecks in the distribution process, but it’s also led to a different kind of chaos.

Woman who allegedly stole laptop from Pelosi's office to sell to Russia is arrested

Photo: FBI

A woman accused of breaching the Capitol and planning to sell to Russia a laptop or hard drive she allegedly stole from Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office was arrested in Pennsylvania's Middle District Monday, the Department of Justice said.

Driving the news: Riley June Williams, 22, is charged with illegally entering the Capitol as well as violent entry and disorderly conduct. She has not been charged over the laptop allegation and the case remains under investigation, per the DOJ.