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The Republican health care plan would sharply decrease the amount of federal assistance offered to low-income people to help purchase health care, according to a draft bill leaked to Politico.

Read on for the highlights of the draft proposal.

  • Eliminates Obamacare's individual mandate, industry taxes and income-based subsidies.
  • It would significantly reduce federal Medicaid spending and cap payments to states based on the number of enrollees. Medicaid expansion would be eliminated in 2020. Expansion states could continue covering those people, but would receive much less money to do so.
  • People would have to keep themselves insured or pay a 30 percent penalty when they sign up for coverage.
  • The minimum benefit requirements would be repealed beginning in 2020. (It's questionable whether this would be allowed under the Senate budget "reconciliation" rules.)
  • Starting in 2020, tax credits based on age — not income — would be given to those on the individual market. Those under 30 would receive a $2,000 credit, which would double for those over 60.
  • $100 billion would be given to states in "innovation grants" to help cover high-risk, expensive enrollees.
  • The tax break for employer-sponsored coverage benefits would be capped at the 90th percentile of current premiums.

Yes, but: The bill-drafting process involves a lot of revision. If estimates of the impact of this proposal are politically unpalatable, we could see a lot of tweaks going forward.

The context: One sign of trouble with this draft: The House health care committees haven't scheduled any markups of the legislation for next week, despite GOP leaders' statements that they'd release more details right after the congressional recess.

Go deeper

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
3 hours ago - Health

Schools face an uphill battle to reopen during the pandemic

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Biden's plan to accelerate the reopening of K-8 schools faces major challenges from a still out-of-control pandemic and more contagious coronavirus variants.

Why it matters: The longer American kids miss in-person schooling, the further they fall behind. But the uncertain state of the science on the role young children play in the pandemic continues to complicate efforts to reopen schools.

Focus group: Former Trump voters say he should never hold office again

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

"Relief" is the top emotion some swing voters who used to support Donald Trump say they felt as they watched President Biden's swearing-in, followed by "hope."

Why it matters: For voters on the bubble between parties, this moment is less about excitement for Biden or liberal politics than exhaustion and disgust with Trump and a craving for national healing. Most said Trump should be prohibited from ever holding office again.

Updated 17 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
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  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
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  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.