Nov 4, 2017

Donna Brazile considered replacing Hillary as nominee in 2016

Donna Brazile, vice chair of the Democratic National Committee and serving as interim chair until November, speaks on the floor of the Democratic National Convention . Photo: Paul Sancya / AP

In her forthcoming book, former DNC chairwoman Donna Brazile says she considered replacing Hillary Clinton with Joe Biden as Democratic presidential nominee after Clinton fainted in public in New York City in September of 2016.

Why it matters: Brazile's book has reignited old wounds among Democrats. Her widely-read essay in Politico earlier this week alleged favoritism from the DNC for the Clinton campaign. This new preview from the Washington Post further adds to her characterization of a bad relationship with the campaign.

More highlights, from WaPo's Philip Rucker:

  • "Brazile writes that she considered a dozen combinations to replace the nominees and settled on Biden and Sen. Cory Booker."
  • "But then, she writes, 'I thought of Hillary, and all the women in the country who were so proud of and excited about her. I could not do this to them.'"
  • "The campaign was so lacking in passion for the candidate, she writes, that its New York headquarters felt like a sterile hospital ward where 'someone had died.'"
  • "Brazile also recounts fiery disagreements with Clinton's staffers — including a conference call in which she told three senior campaign officials, Charlie Baker, Marlon Marshall and Dennis Cheng, that she was being treated like a slave."
  • "Brazile writes that she inherited a national party in disarray, in part because President Obama, Clinton and Wasserman Schultz were 'three titanic egos' who had 'stripped the party to a shell for their own purposes.'

Go deeper: The DNC memo that sparked a Dem-on-Dem war

Go deeper

Updated 28 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Updates: George Floyd protests continue for 8th day

Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators outside of the White House on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued Tuesday across the U.S. for the eighth consecutive day, prompting a federal response from the National Guard, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection.

The latest: The National Park Service said in a statement Tuesday that while it "is committed to the peaceful expression of First Amendment rights," it "cannot tolerate violence to citizens or officers or damage to our nation’s resources that we are entrusted to protect."

American carnage

Protesters race up a hill to avoid tear gas in Philadelphia, June 1. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The list of victims has swiftly grown since George Floyd died in police custody just eight days ago.

The big picture: Protests against police brutality have turned into a showcase of police brutality, with tear gas and rubber bullets deployed against crowds. The police have the arsenals at their disposal, but we're also seeing law enforcement officers becoming targets.

McConnell blocks resolution condemning Trump's actions against peaceful protesters

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) blocked a resolution introduced by Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) on Tuesday that would have condemned the use of tear gas and rubber bullets against peaceful protesters outside the White House on Monday in order to allow President Trump to walk to St. John's Church.

What they're saying: "Justice for black Americans in the face of unjust violence, and peace for our country in the face of looting, riots, and domestic terror. Those are the two issues Americans want addressed," McConnell said on the Senate floor.